Carnedd Dafydd – Douglas Boston Mk III, Z2186, 418 Squadron, 17 Oct 1942 (2)

Boston Z2186, Carnedd Dafydd, 1981. © Hywel Evans, shown with permission.

A previous post featured a rather sorry remnant of the wreckage of the Douglas Boston (Z2186) that crashed on Carnedd Dafydd on 17 October 1942. Hywel Evans has very kindly provided photographs taken at the crash site in 1981, showing both wings and engines of the aircraft.

This was before the site was cleared by a ‘preservation’ group. Apparently, the Boston Havoc Preservation Trust removed all the major items of wreckage from the site, only to immediately sell off one of the wings for scrap and later break up both engines. The remaining parts were sold to private collectors in 2006.

Boston Z2186, Carnedd Dafydd, 1981. © Hywel Evans, shown with permission.

Boston Z2186, Carnedd Dafydd, 1981. © Hywel Evans, shown with permission.

Boston Z2186, Carnedd Dafydd, 1981. © Hywel Evans, shown with permission.

10 thoughts on “Carnedd Dafydd – Douglas Boston Mk III, Z2186, 418 Squadron, 17 Oct 1942 (2)

  1. That wing section looks reasonably intact, not entirely sure it’d be usable. A rather sorry tale though of someone profiteering from this though.

    Like

    • We believe that it is the wing section in this photograph, previously thought to have been scrapped, that we at the City of Norwich Aviation Museum rescued from a private owner on 25th October 2011, the day before it was finally due to be actually scrapped. The wing part as shown in the photograph was, unfortunately, crudely cut in half by the goons who originally recovered it from the mountain.

      Whilst we have saved the part from imminent destruction and will put it on display in our museum (many Bostons were based on Norfolk Airfields), we agree with other commentors that the hill wreckage at these crash sites should be left untouched as a memorial to those who died there. Visitors passing by these sites will now have no sense of the scale of tragedy that took place there or the sacrifice of those brave airmen who lost their young lives. We will do our best to make sure that this is not lost on the visitors to our museum once the wing is on display.

      Incidentally, the wing is covered with the signatures (many dated) of people who visited it over the years while it laid on that ridge. These signatures are now part of its history but were the signatorys dessicrating a war memorial as much as those who removed the wreckage? There’s another debate!

      Like

      • Thanks to The City of Norwich Aviation Museum i and members of my familly now know that our American friends lost a Boston in the Welsh mountains,having served with the R.A.F. inNorth Wales and walked over those hills i/we can reflect on their sad end and wished that people would respect and onlt take away their pictures.

        Like

  2. Are there any parts left as testament to this tragedy? I’m creating a number of GPX routes and am hoping to spend the next year visiting as many of these sites in North Wales as I can in order to ‘sense’ the aura of such places, record my visits and leave a personal tribute to those poor souls, serving our cause…

    Like

  3. I walked past the wreckage of this aircraft in April 1970 when on an Outward Bound course traversing the Carnedds range. My abiding memory was of a virtually intact aircraft just below the summit of Carnedd Dafydd, that had obviously been there for some 25 years or so, at the time. As if it had literally been placed on top of the mountain. An extraordinary sight. I was sure the instructors told us it was a Wellington. I also remember seeing an old leather boot close to the wreckage and thinking it must have belonged to one of the crew. Was only 15 at the time but it left quite a sombre impression on me. It’s rather sad how the site was subsequently desecrated.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am currently writing the story of Mervin Harold Sims, Sgt (Pilot), RCAF who was the only survivor of the crash of Z2186 (Boston III of 418 Squadron based at Bradwell Bay. The Navigator and Wireless Air Gunner were killed instantly in the crash. Sims survived 48 hours on the mountain top before being discovered by chance and carried off the mountain. Sims spent several months in hospital before returning to 418 Squadron. He and his navigator earned DFC’s in 1944 flying Mosquitos.. Sims survived the war and after 2 years with the RAF, settled in Veteran Alberta Canada where he farmed until the late 1980’s. He died in Calgary Alberta in 2007.

      Liked by 1 person

Share your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.