Llyn Ogwen Pillbox I

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Date

18 May 2013
Location

Llyn Ogwen

SH 65486 60489; 53.12454°N, 4.01166°W

Information

With the fall of France and the defeat of the British Expeditionary Force in 1940, Germany, in the hope that Britain would surrender, made threats of imminent invasion. Turning the initial bluff into reality would, however, have taken a certain period of preparation, as Britain’s naval and air forces presented a formidable obstacle to mounting the threatened ground assault (codenamed Operation Sea Lion). Nonetheless, in the face of such threats, Britain undertook a major programme of constructing anti-invasion defences during 1940 and 1941. This involved building a network of coastal defences, backed up by a series of ‘stop lines’. Exploiting both natural and man-made barriers, such as rivers and railway cuttings, the stop lines were intended to slow down the advance inland of any invading force. The stop lines were reinforced with additional obstacles such as anti-tank blocks, barbed-wire entanglements, ditches and minefields, and were defended by gun emplacements and pillboxes.

The pillbox at Llyn Ogwen, protecting the A5 road, was part of Western Command’s network of stop lines in Wales, intended to defend against a possible German invasion coming via Ireland.

British anti-invasion preparations of the Second World War (Wikipedia)

Looking towards Devil's Kitchen

Looking towards Devil’s Kitchen

Looking towards Y Garn

Looking towards Y Garn

Lengths of rail used as roof supports

Lengths of rail used as roof supports

Roof supports

Roof supports

Looking over Llyn Ogwen to the pillbox on the northern shore

Looking over Llyn Ogwen to the pillbox on the northern shore

Pillbox (bottom, right of centre) at the foot of Pen yr Ole Wen

Pillbox (bottom, right of centre) at the foot of Pen yr Ole Wen

10 thoughts on “Llyn Ogwen Pillbox I

  1. My Dad wants his ashes sprinkled in Lake Ogwen so fitting to know it has a military connection!,It was the scene of a near tragedy when in 1941 he ran off the road in heavy rain and ended up half in the lake so reckoned ‘in the end’ the Lake could finally ‘have him’.

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