Now and then III: Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth

Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth

Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth

Date

20 September 2014
Location

Tregarth

SH 60123 67976; 53.19040°N, 4.09503°W

Information

With there having been a Methodist presence in the local area since the 18th century, Shiloh Welsh Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Tregarth was first built in 1829 and then rebuilt in 1896. The adjacent manse, which is now a B & B, was built in 1857. The chapel is a Grade II listed building and is still in use.

 

“Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth (Wesleyan Methodist), where the whole congregation stood up one Sunday evening during the three-year strike and quietly walked out of the Chapel when two 'traitors' walked in” from What I Saw At Bethesda

“Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth (Wesleyan Methodist), where the whole congregation stood up one Sunday evening during the three-year strike and quietly walked out of the Chapel when two ‘traitors’ walked in”
from What I Saw At Bethesda.

Shiloh Chapel

Shiloh Chapel

Italianate-style façade

Italianate-style façade. The house to the right is the former manse, built in 1857, which is now
the Pant Teg B & B.

1896

1896

Yr Eglwys Fethodistaidd Shiloh

Yr Eglwys Fethodistaidd Shiloh
Trefniadau’r Sul • 10.30 a.m. Ysgol Sul • 5.00 p.m. Oedfa’r Hwyr

Shiloh Methodist Church
Sunday Arrangements • 10.30 am Sunday School • 5:00 pm Evening Service

Corinthian pilaster capital

Corinthian pilaster capital

Entrance gates

Entrance gates

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12 thoughts on “Now and then III: Shiloh Chapel, Tregarth

  1. Well done with the photograph and photoshopping, you’ve done well to get things lined up so well. Interesting to see how little has changed, other than the greenery of course.

    • Much appreciated, Andy! Yes, you are right – the road is a little wider here now, but the view has remained pretty similar. There are bigger changes just round the corner to the left of the red-brick house – the former railway station has disappeared. More on that later. Watch this space…

  2. I kept scrolling comparing the first three pictures 🙂 I really like this photo project – brilliant idea! Much greener now as I can see. And the additional photos are really nice too! Well done Graham!

    • Yes, the narrow-gauge Penrhyn Quarry Railway and the standard-gauge Bethesda branch line followed similar routes to Bangor. At this point the PQR curved around the back of the chapel (to the right) and the branch line went under a road bridge to the left of the red brick house. Just behind the camera position is an access point to the cycle path Lon Las Ogwen, which follows parts of the track beds of both lines.

  3. That’s really interesting. I had a happy half hour trying to work out where this was and where the PQR had run from the old OS maps. The photos are very effectively photoshopped, nice work!

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