Now and then IV: Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Date

21 September 2014
Location

Tregarth

SH 60380 68039; 53.19104°N, 4.09121°W

Information

During the Great Strike of 1900-1903 at his slate quarry in Bethesda, the 2nd Baron Penrhyn built a row of houses in the nearby village of Tregarth as accommodation for strike-breaking quarrymen. Locally known as Stryd y Gynffon (Traitors’ Row), Tanrhiw Road was laid out next to the railway station on the Bethesda branch of the London and North Western Railway (LNWR), which had opened in 1884. Passenger traffic on this branch line ceased in 1951 and the track was completely closed in 1963, with the station being demolished in the 1980s. A community centre and recreation ground now occupy the site of the former railway and station.

 

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

“Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth. A row of houses built by Lord Penrhyn for the men who had returned to work and felt it was too dangerous for them to live in Bethesda where they were seen as ‘traitors’”
from What I Saw At Bethesda.

Notice the railway line – part of the Bethesda branch of the London and North Western Railway – and station (L), which opened in 1884. The line closed to passengers in 1951 and for goods in 1963.

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Tanrhiw Road from Dob, with Anglesey and the Menai Strait in the distance and the top of Penrhyn Castle – the lavishly extravagant neo-Norman mock castle that served as Lord Penrhyn’s residence in Wales – just visible in the middle distance

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Playing field behind Tanrhiw Road on the site of the former railway through Tregarth

Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

Tanrhiw Road, now with houses along both sides of the road

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16 thoughts on “Now and then IV: Tanrhiw Road, Tregarth

    • Yes, there are a lot more houses there now! It wasn’t possible to get a shot exactly equivalent to the original as there are now so many more trees and houses. Thanks for visiting, Indah.

  1. This is proving to be a fascinating series, Graham…I am intrigued by the early photo with the railway station, its goods shed and crane. Great overview as well, with view to Anglesey.

  2. I love blogs of ‘place’ along with ‘place history’ and the ‘people of that place’. This is interesting stuff. Thanks for sharing and thanks for looking in on my ‘place’. Would that I could write an interesting bit of history to go with it….

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