Celtic Gateway Bridge, Holyhead

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Date

12 October 2014
Location

Holyhead

SH 24734 82469; 53.31006°N, 4.63213°W

Information

A ten-year regeneration strategy for the town of Holyhead was launched in 2003. A central element of this was improving access between the town centre and the ferry terminal and railway station, with the hopes of enticing more of the 2.4 million passengers using the port each year into the town and thereby improving its economy. Taking centre stage in the plans was the £7.5m Celtic Gateway project. This involved creating a walkway between the port’s railway station and the High Street and was funded by the EU Objective One programme, the Welsh Assembly Government and the erstwhile Welsh Development Agency. The pedestrian link comprises two bridges: a causeway bridge over the Inner Harbour and the adjoining Celtic Gateway Bridge crossing Victoria Road and the West Dock railway lines. The latter bridge was envisaged as an iconic landmark giving ferry visitors from Ireland a dramatic first impression of the town.

Work on the 128m-long, 4m-wide causeway bridge, which was designed and built by Dartford-based multinational construction company Laing O’Rourke, commenced in February 2004. Construction of the Celtic Gateway bridge, which was designed by engineering consultants Gifford (now part of the Denmark-based international consulting group Ramboll), fabricated by Cimolai SpA in Italy, and assembled by Laing O’Rourke, started in November 2005 and was completed in October 2006.

The Celtic Gateway Bridge was built in lean duplex stainless steel and its 70m main-span is supported by two 15-tonne welded inclined-plane tubular arches 1m in diameter and 8m high. Three months after its opening there were complaints over unsightly brown stains forming on the bridge. It turned out that the contractors had incorrectly used iron bolts instead of stainless steel fittings and these were corroding with the rust staining the concrete.

Further Reading

Bridges to lead town regeneration (BBC News, 18 Oct 2006);
Bolts rusting on £5m ‘gleaming icon’ bridge (Daily Post, 24 Jan 2007)

 

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Causeway Bridge


Celtic Gateway Bridge

Causeway Bridge

'Pass this way with a pure heart'

‘Pass this way with a pure heart’

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge

Celtic Gateway Bridge crossing Victoria Road and the West Dock railway lines

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20 thoughts on “Celtic Gateway Bridge, Holyhead

  1. Some really super photos of this structure. I like your choice of focal lengths, emphasising the chaotic and incongruous nature of the site. #8, 9 and 10 are really something. We trudged over the bridge last year, selling maps. Couldn’t find a suitable shop, which says it all about Holyhead. It could be such a fascinating town, but is so beset by social deprivation…all the money seems to just rumble through.

    • I stumbled upon this excerpt from The Rough Guide to Wales while researching the bridge:

      Drab HOLYHEAD is Anglesey’s largest town and the terminus for ferry routes to Ireland. It isn’t somewhere you’ll want to spend much time, and reasonably well-integrated train and ferry timetables mean you shouldn’t need to. Walking into town from the train and ferry terminals you get to experience the town’s latest rejuvenation attempt, a pedestrian steel-arch bridge known as the Celtic Gateway, which deposits you on depressing Market Street…

  2. Probably the shiniest bridge I’ve ever seen. Using iron bolts sounds like a cost cutting effort in behalf of the contractors who will have put the lowest possible bid in then looked for ways to make savings……

  3. What a huge metal structure! The pictures make it look “lighter” than it surely is 😉 . I have really enjoyed the details, and also the pictures of the whole thing suggesting a dynamic nature. Congrats and thank you for the writing.

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