Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Date

28 March 2015
Location

Atcham, Shropshire

SJ 54703 09962; 52.68543°N, 2.67152°W

Information

Richard Hill purchased what is now known as Attingham estate in 1700 and built Tern Hall mansion there. The estate was inherited by his nephew, whose son, Noel Hill, became the 1st Baron Berwick in 1784. On his father’s death, Noel embarked upon a programme of alterations. A new hall designed by architect George Steuart was built around the existing Tern Hall in 1783-85 and was given the name Attingham. Landscape gardener Thomas Leggett had created tree plantations in the 1770s and Humphry Repton was contracted in 1797 to improve the park’s landscaping. Attingham Park was left to the National Trust by the 8th Baron Berwick in 1947. The estate currently covers an area of 1600 hectares, half of its size in the early 19th century, and the main hall is a Grade 1 listed building.

Further Reading

Attingham Park (Historic England);
Attingham Park (National Trust)

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Stables

Stables. The stable block is a Grade II* listed building.

Oculus

Oculus

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Dining Room

Dining Room

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Greenhouse

Greenhouse

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Rear entrance

Rear entrance – the walled service yard

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Ionic capital

Ionic capital

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Cedars of Lebanon

Cedars of Lebanon. The trees were probably planted in 1802, and are unfortunately slowly dying.

Attingham Park

Attingham Park

Stables entrance

Stables entrance

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16 thoughts on “Attingham Park

  1. Beautiful photos. This brought back memories, as I stayed here for two weeks in the seventies on a uni field studies course. One of our party had considerable keyboard skills and rocked the harpsichord with some mean tunes…the instrument was quickly removed by the authorities 🙂

    • Many thanks again, Alexandra. And yes I was intrigued by the Cyrillic lettering and thought there must be some interesting story behind it connecting it with the history of the house. Unfortunately not, alas! as I discovered afterwards. It seems it was a fairly recent purchase from eBay and is used for visitors to listen to some recordings, although it wasn’t working when I was there.

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