Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron – Great Exhibition

‘Africa’ lamp standard, from a series of four cast-iron standards representing continents, produced by the Coalbrookdale Company in the 1860s and thought to have been designed by John Bell

Africa lamp standard, from a series of four cast-iron standards representing continents, produced by the Coalbrookdale Company in the 1860s and thought to have been designed by John Bell

Date

30 March 2015
Location

Coalbrookdale

SJ 66770 04671; 52.63874°N, 2.49248°W

Information

Further Reading

Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron

Boy and Swan Fountain (John Bell).  This was one of pieces displayed in 1851 by the  Coalbrookdale Company at the Great Exhibition in Crystal Palace, Hyde Park.  The work was sold to Wolverhampton Corporation but returned to Coalbrookdale in 1959.

Boy and Swan Fountain (John Bell). This was one of pieces displayed in 1851 by the Coalbrookdale Company at the Great Exhibition in Crystal Palace, Hyde Park. The work was sold to Wolverhampton Corporation but returned to Coalbrookdale in 1959.

Andromeda. One of the Coalbrookdale Company’s pieces shown at the 1851 Great Exhibition was a bronze statue of Andromeda designed by sculptor John Bell. This cast-iron version was made afterwards.

Andromeda. One of the Coalbrookdale Company’s pieces shown at the 1851 Great Exhibition was a bronze statue of Andromeda designed by sculptor John Bell. This cast-iron version was made afterwards.

In Greek mythology, Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess. Her mother, Cassiopeia, was punished for her arrogance by the god of the sea Poseidon, who sent the sea monster Cetus to wreak havoc on the country. Chained naked to a rock, Andromeda was offered as sacrifice in appeasement. She was rescued from her fate by Perseus, who turned the sea monster to stone using the head of the Gorgon Medusa.

In Greek mythology, Andromeda was an Ethiopian princess. Her mother, Cassiopeia, was punished for her arrogance by the god of the sea Poseidon, who sent the sea monster Cetus to wreak havoc on the country. Chained naked to a rock, Andromeda was offered as sacrifice in appeasement. She was rescued from her fate by Perseus, who turned the sea monster to stone using the head of the Gorgon Medusa.

Andromeda (John Bell)

Andromeda (John Bell)

Andromeda (John Bell)

Andromeda (John Bell)

Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron

Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron

Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron

Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron

Oak and Ivy Chair – part of a garden bench and chairs set designed in 1859.  The Coalbrookdale Company produced a range of garden furniture featuring different floral designs.

Oak and Ivy Chair – part of a garden bench and chairs set designed in 1859. The Coalbrookdale Company produced a range of garden furniture featuring different floral designs.

Scuttle Grate – the W. S. Scott Morton Patent Scuttle Grate featured in the Coalbrookdale Company's 1902 catalogue.  The decorative grate had a coal scuttle on either side of the fire.

Scuttle Grate – the W. S. Scott Morton Patent Scuttle Grate featured in the Coalbrookdale Company’s 1902 catalogue. The decorative grate had a coal scuttle on either side of the fire.

Scuttle Grate

Scuttle Grate

The 'snake-handled vase' featured in the Coalbrookdale Company's 1875 catalogue

The ‘snake-handled vase’ featured in the Coalbrookdale Company’s 1875 catalogue

Chair-back detail

Chair-back detail

Chair backs

Chair backs

Radiator

Radiator

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Coalbrookdale Museum of Iron – Great Exhibition

  1. Super photos, as per! I love the way that in your photos the sculptures look as if they are carved from Jet. Beautiful control of light and tone. How would the Victorians have perpetrated their flights of erotic fancy without the Greek Legends to help justify them 🙂

  2. Beautiful, amazing how iron, a material more widely used as a construction and heavy engineering material could also be considered for use in something as ornately decorate as these items.

Share your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s