Jackfield Tile Museum

Splashback detail.  Tiled washstands were popular in middle-class Victorian and Edwardian bedrooms.  The splashbacks not only protected the walls from splashes but also provided a decorative feature.

Splashback detail. Tiled washstands were popular in middle-class Victorian and Edwardian bedrooms. The splashbacks not only protected the walls from splashes but also provided a decorative feature.

Date

31 March 2015
Location

Jackfield

SJ 68608 02962; 52.62349°N, 2.46517°W

Information

Further Reading

Jackfield Tile Museum

Titania: Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed, While I thy amiable cheeks do coy, And stick musk-roses in thy sleek smooth head, And kiss thy fair large ears, my gentle joy.  (Midsummer Night's Dream, Act 4, Scene 1)

Titania:
Come, sit thee down upon this flowery bed,
While I thy amiable cheeks do coy,
And stick musk-roses in thy sleek smooth head,
And kiss thy fair large ears, my gentle joy.
(Midsummer Night’s Dream, Act 4, Scene 1)

Kissing her (Desdemona): That e'er our hearts shall make! Iago [aside] O, you are well tuned now! But I'll set down the pegs that make this music (Othello, Act 2, Scene 1)

Kissing her (Desdemona):
That e’er our hearts shall make!
Iago [aside]
O, you are well tuned now!
But I’ll set down the pegs that make this music
(Othello, Act 2, Scene 1)

Rosalind: From the east to western Ind,  No jewel is like Rosalind.  Her worth, being mounted on the wind,  Through all the world bears Rosalind (As you like it, Act 3, Scene 2)

Rosalind:
From the east to western Ind,
No jewel is like Rosalind.
Her worth, being mounted on the wind,
Through all the world bears Rosalind
(As you like it, Act 3, Scene 2)

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Fireplace

Fireplace

Fireplace

Fireplace

Jackfield Tile Museum

Jackfield Tile Museum

Detail, Majolica tile panel produced by Maw & Co and shown at the 1867 Paris Exhibition.  The peacock tile is by John Moyr Smith.

Detail, Majolica tile panel produced by Maw & Co and shown at the 1867 Paris Exhibition. The peacock tile is by John Moyr Smith.

Fairies at the Christening by Margaret E Thompson for Doulton & Co (c 1905).  A hand-painted tiled panel with a scene from Sleeping Beauty was created for a children's ward in a hospital.

Fairies at the Christening by Margaret E Thompson for Doulton & Co (c 1905). The hand-painted tiled panel with a scene from Sleeping Beauty was created for a children’s ward in a hospital.

Items produced by the Craven Dunnill Factory.  The company moved out in the 1950s but returned in 2001 to take over the manufacturing business at the site which it shares with the Tile Museum.

Items produced by the Craven Dunnill Factory. The company moved out in the 1950s but returned in 2001 to take over the manufacturing business at the site which it shares with the Tile Museum.

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9 thoughts on “Jackfield Tile Museum

  1. There’s some beautiful examples of tiles among that selection. Engine houses of textile mills often had some beautiful tiling like the ones here, but so often these have just been destroyed went the places have been demolished, sadly.

  2. The stylised artwork of the tiles rendered in black and white and juxtaposed with the bard’s lines makes a strange dissonance…there’s something about the (edwardian?) artwork that is slighly disturbing. Your photos of the textures here are masterful and the pot bokeh is beautiful.

    • We had a week’s holiday in Shrewsbury, which is a couple of hour’s drive away, and visited a few of the Ironbridge Gorge Museums which were quite close. You can buy a single ticket that lets you get into about 10 different attractions – including the iron museum, the tile museum and the open-air Victorian town – as many times as you like for a year. So I had no shortage of photo opportunities on that trip!

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