Powis Castle

Powis Castle

Fame by Andries Carpentiere (c1677-1737) from the workshop of John van Nost the elder (d 1729). Carpentiere, of Flemish origin, had settled in England by 1700 and was trained by the Flemish-born London-based sculptor van Nost, becoming his principal assistant. The workshop supplied many of the lead garden sculptures in the castle grounds.

Date

2 April 2015
Location

Welshpool

SJ 21494 06513; 52.65063°N, 3.16188°W

Information

Subsequently remodelled several times, Powis Castle was first built around 1200 as a fortress for the hereditary Welsh Princes of Powys. In 1286, following Edward I’s invasion of Wales, the last Welsh Prince of Powys gave up his royal title and became Baron de la Pole. In 1579 the title and estate were sold to Edward Herbert. The castle then became the home of the Earls of Powis, a title that has been created three times. The first creation lasted from 1674 until 1748; the second from 1748 until 1801; and the third was created in 1804 in favour of Edward Clive, son of Major General Robert “Clive of India” Clive and son-in-law of the 1st Earl of the 2nd creation. Edward changed his surname to Herbert. At the start of the 20th century the 4th Earl, George Charles Herbert (1862-1952) and his wife Violet (1865-1929) embarked on a major programme to restore the castle and its gardens. The 4th Earl, who had lost both of his sons in the First and Second World Wars, left the property to the National Trust. Powis Castle is a Grade I listed building.

Further Reading

Powis Castle and Garden (National Trust);
Powis Castle (Wikipedia)

Powis Castle

Medusa’s head, shield detail, Fame.

Powis Castle

The statue in the courtyard depicts the female figure Fame borne by the winged horse Pegasus. It originally featured as a fountain centrepiece in the Baroque water gardens that were located at the bottom of the terraces, but which were demolished in the first decade of the 19th century. The piece was restored in 1987 and received a Grade II* listing in 1996.

Powis Castle

“Removed from Claremont A.D. 1930. Erected at Powis Castle 1931.”
The Grade II listed lead statue is thought to date from the 18th century and was moved from Claremont, a Clive family home in Surrey.

Powis Castle

Peacock displaying. Domesticated Indian peafowl have been a status symbol since Roman times and were popular in country estates. It was designated the national bird of India in 1963.

Powis Castle

Peacock

Powis Castle

Powis Castle

Powis Castle

Shepherd statue, Orangery Terrace.

Powis Castle

Shepherd statue, Orangery Terrace.

Powis Castle

Shepherd piper statue, Aviary Terrace.

Powis Castle

One of a pair of lead wyverns (holding a left hand in its mouth) surmounting the piers of the gates in the formal gardens created by Violet (1865-1929), wife of the fourth Earl, George Charles Herbert (1862-1952). The couple engaged the services of Gothic Revival architect George Frederick Bodley (1827-1907) in 1902 for their major renovation of the castle and gardens.

Powis Castle

Detail, Grade II listed iron Fountain Garden gates.

Powis Castle

Gateway elephant-and-gryphon coat of arms of the Herbert family. The motto, Ung Jay Serviray (un je servirai) means One will I serve

Powis Castle

Grade II listed sundial in the Fountain Garden.

Powis Castle

Fountain Garden, part of the formal gardens created by Lady Violet c1911.

Powis Castle

Yew topiary on the Top Terrace. First planted in the 1680s. The yews were originally trimmed in conical shapes. A hundred years later the less geometric Landscape Style was in vogue and the yews were left to grow into their natural shape. Fashions changed again in Victorian times when the yews were trimmed using sickles. The task is now performed with electric trimmers and it takes four people three months to trim all the yews in the castle grounds.

Powis Castle

Sluice gate, Stable Pond.

Powis Castle

Yew hedges.

Powis Castle

Powis Castle from the formal gardens.

Powis Castle

Yew hedges.

Powis Castle

Terrace

Powis Castle

Lawn art. Every year the gardeners at Powis create a new design in the Great Lawn.

Powis Castle

Powis Castle, showing the Top, Aviary, Orangery and Lower Terraces. Architect William Winde was employed in the 1680s by William Herbert, Marquess of Powis (c1626-1696) to develop the terraces, which were cut into the bedrock.

19 thoughts on “Powis Castle

    • Many thanks and yes there is a lot of photographic potential in the grounds there. A few years ago the National Trust lifted its blanket ban of photography in the interior of its properties. Powis, however, is sadly one of those individual properties that hasn’t moved with the times in this regard.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Iain. The highlight of the visit had to be seeing the male Indian peafowls displaying. On the walk up to the castle from the car park I’d just been saying that I’d never seen a peacock fan its tail before 🙂

      Like

  1. Pingback: St Mary and St Nicholas Church, Beaumaris | GeoTopoi

  2. Hi Graham! ha, ha, ha…I see that Medusa scared me here too! Anyway….this place is amazing. I guess I was so taken aback by Medusa the first time, I didn’t notice those hedges! They are really beautiful. You go to some fantastic places….have a nice evening…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha ha, yes, at least she is consistent! The grounds there are indeed amazing and make for a very pleasant visit. I do like the yew hedges there too. Thanks again for the comments and enjoy the rest of your day, Diana.

      Like

  3. Pingback: 2015 Retrospective | GeoTopoi

  4. Pingback: Powis Castle | GeoTopoi

  5. Pingback: Powis Castle – Roman Emperors | GeoTopoi

Share your thoughts...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.