Plas Ty Coch, Caernarfon

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Date

19 March 2016

Location

Bangor Road, Caernarfon
SH 49026 64333; 53.15466°N, 4.25926°W

Information

Plas Ty Coch is a Grade II listed early 19th century villa overlooking the Menai Strait on the north-eastern outskirts of Caernarfon. An associated tunnel, also Grade II listed, links the villa with farm buildings on the other side of Bangor Road and is dated 1807. The mansion may have been built around the same time and first appears on local maps in 1841. It was later divided into two separate properties – the main, square-plan villa, and the long service wing to the North East, the latter becoming known as Ty Coch Farmhouse.

In 1998 Ty Coch Farm was sold for £230,000. In 2000 local developer Chris Goalen had plans to convert the villa into a 10-bedroom hotel and 30-seat restaurant. This was part of a wider scheme to develop both Ty Coch and the adjoining Plas Brereton estate, in which Plas Brereton manor would have been converted into a seven-bedroom hotel and a 96-seat restaurant, outbuildings would have been converted and extended for use as a fitness centre and swimming pool, and the private dock and former dock keeper’s house (‘Beach Cottage’) would also have been restored. Goalen’s plans never came to fruition though and the property together with the nearby Plas Brereton farmhouse were offered for sale in 2008 for £3.95 million. Plas Coch has, however, since remained empty with its condition steadily deteriorating. Its most recent owners, Somerset-based Menai Strait Properties, was voluntarily dissolved in June 2015.

Further Reading

Plas Ty Coch, Caernarfon (British Listed Buildings);
Chris Goalen’s Proposed Development of Ty Coch and Plas Brereton (1999)

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

The veranda was a later 19th century addition to the house

Plas Ty Coch

The Grade II listed, brick-vaulted tunnel providing access below Bangor Road to nearby farm buildings is dated 1807

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

The former service wing

Plas Ty Coch

Garage

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Tuscan pilaster and column (main entrance portal detail)

Plas Ty Coch

Greenhouse in the walled kitchen garden

Plas Ty Coch

Greenhouse

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

Plas Ty Coch

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15 thoughts on “Plas Ty Coch, Caernarfon

  1. A lovely set of photos and quite a scoop, well done 🙂 The architecture is so redolent of that poeriod…I have often thought about those farm buildings on the right as you are going to Bangor, now derelict along with the modern house next to them, are these the ones connected by the tunnel? It must have been a busy road even back then!

  2. sad that it’s fallen into such a state but such a great urban decay piece for you to explore. Love the shots, especially the brass (?) light switches. Also in my head I am reading it as Plas tic-ock, which makes me laugh. Don’t think thats right 🙂

  3. omg, what a place… this is exactly how I imagine “The Fall of the House of Usher” by E.A.Poe… the minute I scrolled over the image with the year 1807, and that immediately came to mind… despite the ruin, your photos are wonderful, and the last one is just exquisite wow.. ♥

  4. A great set of images of a house slowly fading into oblivion. It’s sad to think they may be amongst the last images recorded of it. Love the old ironwork, shame to see that craftmanship rusting away. Looks like another candidate for future demolition and redevelopment?

  5. Pingback: 2016 Retrospective | GeoTopoi

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