Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Date

20 May 2017

Location

Treborth, Bangor
SH 55240 71098; 53.21714°N, 4.16947°W

Information

The land for Treborth Botanic Garden was purchased by Bangor University in the 1960s in order to develop a plant collection for its Botany Department. The garden had previously been developed in the 1840s as part of the Chester and Holyhead Railway’s planned tourist destination Britannia Park. This was designed by architect and gardener Sir Joseph Paxton (1803 – 1865) – best known for designing the 1851 Great Exhibition’s Crystal Palace. However, lack of funding led to the project being abandoned.

The botanic garden is host to more than 2,000 native and exotic species and the university maintains six glasshouses on the site. The university provides free access to the grounds to the public throughout the year.

Further Reading

Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Moongate, Two Dragons Chinese Garden. This garden is the result of a collaborative cultural-exchange project between Treborth Botanic Garden and Bangor University’s Confucius Institute.

Two Dragons Chinese Garden, Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Bog Garden, Treborth Botanic Garden

Lucombe Oak (Quercus x hispanica Lucombeana) thought to have been planted c1850. The Lucombe Oak is a hybrid of the Turkey Oak and the Cork Oak and was discovered by William Lucombe in 1763.

Treborth Botanic Garden

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