Llanfairfechan

Llanfairfechan beach, looking towards Anglesey (left) and Puffin Island (centre), with a faint auroral glow above the horizon

Date

7 November 2017

Location

Llanfairfechan
SH 67906 75446; 53.25950°N, 3.98171°W

Information

Llanfairfechan;
More posts in the Llanfairfechan series

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Light Ring

Light Ring, Information Board on Malltraeth Cob

Light Ring, Information Board on Malltraeth Cob

Date

3 July 2015

Location

Malltraeth, Anglesey
SH 40836 68453; 53.18927°N, 4.38369°W

Information

The light rings were observed on the perspex cover of the information panel on Malltraeth Cob.

The image has been featured on the Optics Picture of the Day site, which gives an explanation of the optical phenomena behind the effect.

Further Reading

Scratched perspex, light rings and diffraction (Atmospheric Optics);
Malltraeth Cob

Montaña de Arena, Fuerteventura

Looking towards Montaña de la Blanca from the summit of Montaña de Arena.  The apparently converging 'anti-crepuscular rays' are formed by shadows being cast by clouds on the opposite side of the sky.

Looking towards Montaña de la Blanca from the summit of Montaña de Arena. The apparently converging ‘anti-crepuscular rays’ are formed by shadows being cast by clouds on the opposite side of the sky.

Date

3 April 2013
Location

La Oliva, Fuerteventura

28.633835°N, 13.929066°W

Information

Created 185,000 years ago, Montaña de Arena (422m) was declared a Natural Monument in 1994. The mountain is located 2.5km north of La Oliva in northern Fuerteventura, and its volcanic ‘bad lands’ plain, the Malpaís de la Arena, stretches some 6km from La Oliva northwards to Lajares. There are two conjoined craters at the top of the volcano’s pyroclastic cone, which stands 120m above the base of the mountain.

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Holyhead Breakwater

At 1.7 miles long, Holyhead Breakwater, completed in 1873, is the longest in the UK.

Date

17 June 2012
Location

Holyhead, Anglesey

SH 25661 84774; 53.33106°N, 4.61950°W

Information

Holyhead’s role as a port for mail-packet crossings to Ireland dates back to the 16th century, but it was in the 19th century that major changes were made as part of a programme of improvements to the mail route from London to Dublin. A new harbour of refuge, where boats could shelter in bad weather, was created when a long breakwater was built off Soldiers Point. Construction began in 1845 and was completed in 1873, with the work initially supervised by James Meadows Rendel and after Rendel’s death in 1856, by John Hawkshaw. The mock castle at Soldiers Point was built in 1848 as the Superintendent Engineer’s residence.

The 19m-high lighthouse at the end of the breakwater, with its unusual square tower, was probably designed by Hawkshaw and was completed in 1873. It is operated by Trinity House and was automated in 1961.

At 1.7 miles long, the breakwater is the longest in the UK. Seven million tons of quartzite extracted from the quarries on Holyhead Mountain were used in its construction.

In August 2011 the breakwater’s owners, Stena Line, were criticised for their lack of maintenance of the structure. The issue of its proper upkeep has been linked to Conygar Stena’s Holyhead waterfront development plans.

Holyhead Breakwater (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales);
Holyhead Breakwater Lighthouse (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales);
Fears over condition of Holyhead breakwater (The Bangor and Anglesey Mail, 24 Aug 2011)

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