Tynal Tywyll, Lon Las Ogwen – Dinas Railway Tunnel

Dinas Tunnel – the former branch-line railway tunnel between Tregarth and Bethesda, known informally as Tynal Tywyll (dark tunnel).

Date

4 April 2020

Location

Dinas Tunnel, Lon Las Ogwen, Tregarth
SH 60818 68185; 53.19247°N, 4.08473°W

Information

Further Reading

Tynal Tywyll
All posts about Dinas Tunnel;
Lon Las Ogwen

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Aira Force Pier

Lady Dorothy, Ullswater

Date

24 August 2019

Location

Ullswater, Cumbria
NY 39866 19738; 54.56925°N, 2.93162°W

Information

Ullswater ‘Steamers’ opened the jetty on Ullswater lake shore near Aira Force waterfall in 2015. At 12 km long and with a surface area of 9 km2, Ullswater is the second largest of the 16 lakes in the Lake District (the largest being Windermere). This scenic lake has been a popular tourist destination since the 18th century, and was where Donald Campbell set the world water-speed record of 202 mph in 1955. The Lake District was awarded UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 2017, a first for a UK national park.

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Fri Skien

Fri Skien

Date

21 August 2018

Location

Campbeltown, Kintyre, Argyll and Bute
NR 72150 20344; 55.42384°N, 5.60224°W

Information

Fri Skien is a general-cargo ship operated by Norwegian shipping company Høyergruppen AS. Constructed in the Netherlands in 2000, the vessel is 89m long with a beam of 13m. Its hold has a capacity of 5,669 cubic metres and its maximum deadweight (the weight it can carry) is 3,792 tonnes. Pictured here on 21 August 2018, she arrived in Campbeltown on the 19th and her next port of call was Rostock, Germany, arriving there on the 26th.

Further Reading

Campbeltown

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Merseyrail’s Lime Street Station, Liverpool

Lime Street Station

Lime Street Station

Date

21 November 2015

Location

Lime Street, Liverpool

SJ 35019 90544;
53.40767°N, 2.97895°W

Information

Liverpool’s Lime Street Station is the city centre’s main railway station and comprises Network Rail’s nine-platform mainline terminus together with Merseyrail’s single-platform underground station. It thus provides a connection between a branch of the West Coast Main Line and Merseyrail’s Wirral Line.

The underground station is one of six in Merseyrail’s network and was opened in 1977 on the completion of the new single-track Loop Line tunnel under the city centre. The latter links to the Mersey Railway Tunnel, which opened in 1886 to provide a rail link between Liverpool and Birkenhead under the River Mersey.

Further Reading

Lime Street Station

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Anglesey Aluminium and Penrhos Beach, Holyhead

Looking towards Holyhead ferry terminal from the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path at Penrhos Beach

Looking towards Holyhead ferry terminal from the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path at Penrhos Beach

Date

9 August 2015

Location

Penrhos Beach, Holyhead, Anglesey
SH 26210 81527; 53.30209°N, 4.60949°W

Information

The aluminium smelting works in Holyhead started production in 1971. Owned by Anglesey Aluminium Metal Ltd (AAM), a joint venture between Rio Tinto Group and Kaiser Aluminium, it produced 142,000 tonnes of aluminium per year and employed around 500 people. It was the UK’s biggest single consumer of electricity and was powered mainly from Wylfa nuclear power station on the north Anglesey coast. However, when the power contract ended in 2009 no viable alternative was found and the plant was closed down. A smaller-scale re-melting operation with a staff of 100 was then started, but this too ceased in 2013 in the face of dwindling demand and increasing costs.

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Kingsway Tunnel

Kingsway Tunnel

Kingsway Tunnel

Date

23 May 2015
Location

Liverpool to Wallasey

SJ 34465 91503; 53.41622°N, 2.98748°W

Information

A railway tunnel below the River Mersey, linking Liverpool with the Wirral peninsula, was opened in 1886. However, by the 1920s there were growing problems with traffic congestion from motor vehicles waiting for ferries to cross the river. Construction of the Queensway Tunnel was therefore started in 1925 with the tunnel opening in 1934. At 2 miles long, this was at the time the world’s longest underwater tunnel. The 1.5-mile-long, twin-tube Kingsway Tunnel was opened in 1971 after five years’ construction as a second toll road crossing in order to alleviate congestion in the Queensway Tunnel. The Kingsway is currently used by some 45,000 vehicles per day and the Queensway by 35,000. In November 2014 it was announced that plans for an £8 million, two-year project to replace the Kingsway Tunnel’s original lighting with 1,700 LED lights had been approved. The work is to be carried out during scheduled maintenance closures and is set to save £66,000 in electricity costs per year.

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Lime Street Station, Liverpool

'Chance Meeting' (Bessie Braddock) by Tom Murphy, Lime Street Station, Liverpool

Bronze statue of Labour politician Bessie Braddock, which together with an adjacent bronze of comedian Ken Dodd (b 1927) forms an installation entitled Chance Meeting. The work by self-taught local sculptor Tom Murphy (b 1949) was commissioned by Merseytravel to celebrate these two well known Liverpool figures as part of its public art programme and was unveiled by Ken Dodd himself in the concourse of Lime Street Station in June 2009.

Elizabeth Margaret Braddock, née Bamber (1899-1970) served on Liverpool council from 1930 to 1961 and was MP for the former Liverpool Exchange constituency from 1945 until 1970. She is depicted here holding an egg, a reference to her part in the introduction in 1957 of the Lion mark used to identify British eggs (the British Lion stamp was re-introduced in 1998 as a quality mark for eggs produced to certain food-safety standards).

Braddock was, incidentally, also a key figure in the plans to create the reservoir Llyn Celyn in north Wales to supply Liverpool with water, which involved the controversial flooding of the Tryweryn valley in 1965.

Date

23 May 2015
Location

Lime Street, Liverpool

SJ 35019 90544; 53.40767°N, 2.97895°W

Information

Liverpool’s Lime Street Station is the city centre’s main railway station and comprises Network Rail’s nine-platform mainline terminus together with Merseyrail’s single-platform underground station. It thus provides a connection between a branch of the West Coast Main Line and Merseyrail’s Wirral Line.

The station was first opened to the public in 1836 by the Liverpool and Manchester Railway (LMR), which had purchased the site, formerly used as a cattle market, from the city council in 1833 for £9000. The London and North Western Railway (LNWR) replaced the original building in 1867 with the present northern arched train shed, whose curved roof was designed by Irish iron founder Richard Turner (1798-1881). In 1879 a second, southern shed was completed. The station was taken over by the London Midland and Scottish (LMS) railway in 1923, which became part of British Railways in 1948.

The underground station is one of six in Merseyrail’s network and was opened in 1977 on the completion of the new single-track Loop Line tunnel under the city centre. The latter links to the Mersey Railway Tunnel, which opened in 1886 to provide a rail link between Liverpool and Birkenhead under the River Mersey.

Various other alterations to Lime Street Station have taken place over the years. The concourse was remodelled in 1955 and again in 1984. The train sheds were renovated in 2000. And in 2010 work was completed as part of the £35 million ‘Lime Street Gateway Project’ for the redevelopment of the station and its immediate environs, which included the demolition of buildings in front of the station and the creation of a new public plaza. There is also a major upgrade of the station’s capacity planned for 2016. This will involve an overhaul of its signalling and the provision of additional platforms and will require the closure of the station for eight weeks.

Lime Street Station received a Grade II listing in 1975 and was named ‘Station of the Year’ in the 2010 National Rail Awards.

Further Reading

Liverpool Lime Street railway station (Wikipedia)

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Snowdon Ranger Crossing, Welsh Highland Railway

Snowdon Ranger Crossing, Welsh Highland Railway

Snowdon Ranger Crossing, Welsh Highland Railway

Date

22 March 2015
Location

Snowdon Ranger Path

SH 56449 55194; 53.07462°N, 4.14425°W

Information

On its leg between Waufawr and Rhyd-Ddu stations, the Welsh Highland Railway skirts the shore of Llyn Cwellyn to the north east. Just below Llwyn Onn farm, it crosses the Snowdon Ranger Path, one of the main routes to the summit of Snowdon, which starts by the Youth Hostel on the banks of the lake.

Further Reading

Welsh Highland Railway

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citybikes, Liverpool

citybikes, Hanover Street, Liverpool

citybikes, Hanover Street, Liverpool

Date

29 October 2014
Location

Hanover Street, Liverpool

SJ 34519 89976; 53.40251°N, 2.98636°W

Information

Liverpool City Council approved a public cycle-hire project in April 2013 and the citybike scheme was launched by Olympic gold medallist Chris Boardman in May 2014. With a target of 1000 bikes available from over 100 stations across the city, the scheme is set to be the largest in the UK after London’s ‘Boris’ bikes. citybike is operated by HourBike Ltd and is funded by a £1.5m grant from the Department for Transport’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund. The scheme started with 80 bikes at 10 access points within the city centre. By September there were 320 bikes at over 50 stations and there are now more than 70 bike stations available. The self-service cycles can be hired by registered members of the scheme from one station and dropped off at any other. Annual membership costs £60 and the first half-hour is free but costs £1 per hour thereafter.

Further Reading

citybike;
Citybike hits the road (Liverpool Express, 7 May 2014);

Other posts about Liverpool…

 

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HMS Conway’s Anchor, Merseyside Maritime Museum

Anchor from HMS Conway

Anchor from HMS Conway (The ship’s other anchor is on display in Victoria Dock, Caernarfon.)

Date

29 October 2014
Location

Merseyside Maritime Museum,
Albert Dock, Liverpool

SJ 34052 89860; 53.40141°N, 2.99336°W

Information

Further Reading

Remains from the wrecked HMS Conway, Treborth;
HMS Conway’s Anchor, Caernarfon;

Other posts about Liverpool…

 

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Morris Minor 1000

Morris Minor 1000

Morris Minor 1000

Date

5 October 2013
Location

Bwlch Gwyn Quarry, Gaerwen, Anglesey

SH 48084 72964; 53.23191°N, 4.27744°W

Information

The first British car to achieve sales of more than one million, the Morris Minor was manufactured by Morris Motors Ltd from 1948 to 1972. This popular economy car was designed by Sir Alec Issigonis. The Morris Minor 1000, introduced in 1956, was the third production series, coming after the MM and the Series II.

—oOo—

Bwlch Gwyn Quarry (Anglesey) Ltd is listed in the 1968 fourth edition of the Road Research Laboratory’s Sources of Road Aggregates in Great Britain as a producer of epidiorite, a basalt-group roadstone. The quarry was later used by Anglesey Council contractors as a recycling site for highway maintenance waste, such as old tarmac and concrete, which was processed for re-use on roadways. The abandoned quarry is currently used by the Caernarvonshire & Anglesey Motor Club as a venue for autotest meetings.

Morris Minor (Wikipedia)

 

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