Carnasserie Castle

Carnasserie Castle, Kilmartin

Date

23 August 2018

Location

Carnasserie, Kilmartin, Argyll and Bute
NM 83901 00834; 56.15105°N, 5.48078°W

Information

Carnasserie Castle was in its day one of Argyll’s finest Renaissance mansions. The five-storey tower with adjoining three-storey hall was built in the 1560s by John Carswell (c 1522 – 1572), first Protestant Bishop of the Isles (1565 – 1572). The property was entrusted to Carswell by his patron Archibald Campbell (1537 – 1573), 5th Earl of Argyll. Carswell’s main legacy was his publication in Edinburgh in 1567 of the first book ever printed in Gaelic (Irish or Scottish) – this was a translation of John Knox’s Book of Common Order.

The castle was badly damaged in 1685 by Royalist forces in an uprising by Archibald Campbell (c 1629 – 1685), 9th Earl of Aryll, against James VII, in which Campbell was captured and executed. The castle thereafter lay disused and was purchased in the 19th century by the Malcolms of Poltalloch. Today it is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

Further Reading

Carnasserie Castle (Historic Environment Scotland)

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Campbeltown

Campbeltown

Date

21 August 2018

Location

Campbeltown, Kintyre, Argyll and Bute
NR 72150 20344; 55.42384°N, 5.60224°W

Information

With a population of c. 5,000, Campbeltown is the most southerly main settlement in the Kintyre peninsula. It also lays claim to being the westernmost town in mainland Great Britain. Originally known as Kinlochkilkerran, the town was renamed in the 17th century after Archibald Campbell (1629-1685), 9th Earl of Argyll and Chief of Clan Campbell.

Campbeltown’s importance grew as its industries of fishing, shipbuilding and whisky production thrived. 34 whisky distilleries have been established in the town, with 25 in concurrent operation in its heyday in the mid 19th century, and its fishing fleet numbered more than 600 vessels. Today, shipbuilding has disappeared, fishing activity has vastly reduced, and there are at present three whisky distilleries in operation in the town.

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Inveraray Castle

The entrance porch was designed in 1871 by English architect Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt (1820-1877)

Date

20 August 2018

Location

Inveraray, Argyll and Bute
NN 09555 09313; 56.23806°N, 5.07455°W

Information

The Category A listed Inveraray Castle is set in 6.5 hectares of gardens with the overall estate covering an area of 24,000 hectares. The mansion replaced an earlier 15th-century castle and was designed in 1746 by English architect Roger Morris (1695-1749). The property is located on the shore of Scotland’s longest sea loch, Loch Fyne, and in the 1770s the village of Inveraray was moved in order to secure a more secluded position for the castle.

Inveraray Castle is the ancestral home of the Dukes of Argyll, the chiefs of Clan Campbell. The dukedom was created in 1701 in the Peerage of Scotland and in 1892 the 8th Duke was also created Duke of Argyll in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.

Parts of the castle are open to the public with private apartments being occupied by Torquhil Ian Campbell (b 1968), the 13th and 6th Duke of Argyll, and his family. Campbell is also captain of Scotland’s national elephant polo team.

The castle featured as the fictional Duneagle Castle in the 2012 Christmas special episode of the television series Downton Abbey.

Further Reading

Inveraray Castle

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