Tan-y-garth Arsenic Mine

Tan-y-garth Arsenic Mine

Date

18 June 2011
Location

Tan-y-garth, Bethesda

SH 64007 66897; 53.18172°N, 4.03647°W

Information

The remains of these workings, which date back to the late 18th century, can be seen in a line following the 320 m contour around the lower slopes of Y Garth at the foot of the Carneddau mountains. This line stretches for some 160 metres and runs NNE from SH 63932 66751 to SH 64007 66897. There are several entrances, all of which are flooded.

David Bick (2003) provides the following information about this site:

In 1783 a Mr. Barker investigated various locations on the Penrhyn Estate, amongst which copper and arsenical-pyrites or mispickel were discovered above Tanygarth. The site yielded 232 tons of the latter mineral at a much later date, all of which was humped down the mountain by hand.

David Bick, The Old Copper Mines of Snowdonia, 3rd Edition, 2003, Landmark Publishing (ISBN 1843060752), p. 118.

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Ceunant Arsenic Mine

Entrance to the adit, on the banks of the Ogwen

Date

26 February 2011
Location

Ceunant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63315 64620; 53.16109°N, 4.04585°W

Information

The adit is on the banks of the river Ogwen, close the Arsenic flues. It is now flooded and, at least, partially blocked by various items of rubbish.

Explorations were made at this site in about 1760 by locals, and around 1837 an English company resumed mining activity here, which was stopped because of skin complaints and the pollution of the Afon Ogwen.

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Arsenic Flues, Ceunant

Arsenic Flue, Ceunant

Date

19 February 2011
Location

Ceunant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63244 64563; 53.16056°N, 4.04689°W

Further Information

These cut-and-cover flues would have radiated from a central point where a furnace would have been employed to produce arsenic from the ore mined at workings close by. The life expectancy of the workers employed in this task would not have been very long! Explorations were made at this site in about 1760 by locals, and around 1837 an English company resumed mining activity here, which was stopped because of skin complaints and the pollution of the Afon Ogwen.

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