Metropolitan Cathedral, Liverpool

Metropolitan Cathedral, Liverpool

Date

25 April 2019

Location

Mount Pleasant, Liverpool
SJ 35658 90129; 53.40402°N, 2.96926°W

Information

Further Reading

Metropolitan Cathedral I;
Metropolitan Cathedral II;
Metropolitan Cathedral III;
Metropolitan Cathedral IV;

SEE MORE →

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (3)

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool

Date

29 October 2014
Location

Seen from Mount Pleasant Car Park,
Liverpool

SJ 35318 90218; 53.40478°N, 2.97438°W

Information

Further Reading

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (part 1);
Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (part 2);

Other posts about Liverpool…

 

Bangor Cathedral

Bangor Cathedral

Bangor Cathedral

Date

27 December 2013
Location

Bangor, Gwynedd

SH 58117 72056; 53.22653°N, 4.12685°W

Information

The site of the Cathedral Church of St Deiniol in Bangor has been a place of worship since the 6th century. The Celtic missionary Deiniol founded a monastery there around 530 and his church became a cathedral around 546 when he was made the first bishop of Bangor.

Deiniol had enclosed his plot of land by driving stakes into the ground with branches woven in between. The Welsh term for such a wattle fence was bangor, a name which became associated with the cathedral itself and later the city.

Much of the current building dates back to the 14th and 15th centuries and the cathedral has been rebuilt several times throughout its history, having been destroyed by the Vikings in 1073, by English forces of King John in 1211, and during the Glyndwr rebellion in 1402. Architect Sir George Gilbert Scott carried out a major restoration in 1870-80 and extensive repairs to the exterior were started in 1987.

The Diocese of Bangor (The Church in Wales);
Bangor Cathedral (Wikipedia)

 

SEE MORE →

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (2)

Lit candles in one of the chapels located along the perimeter of the main circular open space

Date

22 August 2012
Location

Mount Pleasant, Liverpool

SJ 35658 90129; 53.40402°N, 2.96926°W

Information

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (part 1);
Other posts about Liverpool

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool (1)

Metropolitan Cathedral, Liverpool – Lantern tower in the form of a truncated cone, surmounted by latticework crown featuring 16 pinnacles

Date

22 August 2012
Location

Mount Pleasant, Liverpool

SJ 35658 90129; 53.40402°N, 2.96926°W

Information

The Grade II* listed Roman Catholic Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King is one of two cathedrals in Liverpool, the other being the Anglican cathedral, located about half a mile away at the other end of Hope Street.

There had been a number of different plans, dating back to the mid 19th century, for a Roman Catholic cathedral in the city, but none was ever completed. In 1930, a nine-acre site at Brownlow Hill, occupied from 1771 until 1928 by a work house, was acquired and in 1933 construction started on a cathedral designed by Edwin Lutyens, which would have become the world’s second largest church, incorporating the largest dome in the world. This was, however, not to be, with the Second World War and costs spiralling out of control getting in the way. Construction of Lutyens’ crypt was completed in 1958, but the rest of his design was thereafter abandoned.

Building began again in 1962, this time under architect Frederick Gibberd, whose design comprised a 59m diameter circular plan, with the previously completed crypt being integrated into the structure. Construction of the Metropolitan Cathedral was completed in 1967.

Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King;
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral (Wikipedia);

Other posts about Liverpool

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Liverpool Cathedral

View from the tower looking down towards the Chapter House

Date

22 October 2011
Location

St James’s Mount, Liverpool

SJ 35385 89411; 53.39754°N, 2.97321°W

Information

With an overall external length, including the annexed Lady Chapel, of 189 m (620 ft), Liverpool Cathedral is the longest in the world. Officially known as the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool, it is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Liverpool. The long axis of the building is aligned North-South, with liturgical East and West therefore corresponding to geographical South and North, respectively.

In 1901 it was decided to hold an open competition for designs for a Church of England cathedral for Liverpool. In 1903 a proposal by 22-year-old architect Giles Gilbert Scott was selected and the following year the foundation stone was laid by Edward VII.

The first part of the building to be finished was the Lady Chapel, which was dedicated in 1910. Around this time, Scott substantially revised his plans for the rest of the structure. Originally conceived as having two towers at the West end and a single transept, the cathedral was now to figure a single, central tower and twin transepts.

Progress was disrupted by the First Word War, and the next section, comprising the High Altar, Chancel and Eastern Transepts, was consecrated as the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool in 1924.

The next phase of construction was of the central section, and work was later hindered again, this time by the Second World War. Nevertheless, Scott performed the topping out ceremony to complete the 101 m (331 ft) tower in 1942.

Scott died in 1960, the year before the Bridge and the first bay of the Nave were finished. Construction of the rest of the cathedral was finally completed in 1978.

Liverpool Cathedral; Liverpool Cathedral (Wikipedia); Liturgical east and west;
David Sheppard (Wikipedia)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Carlisle Cathedral

Barrel-vaulted ceiling of the choir

Date

25 October 2010
Location

Carlisle, Cumbria

NY 39851 55925 54.89440°N, 2.93935°W

Further Information

The Cathedral dates back to 1123 when it was was established as an Augustinian monastery. It received cathedral status in 1133 and is today the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Carlisle. Part of the nave was demolished by the Scottish Presbyterian Army for stone to reinforce Carlisle Castle. The 14th-century barrel-vaulted painted ceiling of the choir was renovated in 1856. The East Window is the largest and most complex in England in the Flowing Decorated Gothic style. The window still contains much of its original medieval stained glass.

Carlisle CathedralCarlisle Cathedral (Wikipedia)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…