Portmeirion

Portmeirion

Amis Reunis stone boat on the Quayside in front of the Hotel Portmeirion

Date

20 August 2014
Location

Portmeirion, Penrhyndeudraeth

SH 59051 37200; 52.91367°N, 4.09760°W

Information

Aber Iâ was a modest estate on the Penrhyndeudraeth peninsula, on Traeth Bach, the tidal estuary of the rivers Afon Glaslyn and Aber Dwyryd, 2 miles south east of Porthmadog. Its Victorian country house was built around 1840.

The estate was purchased in 1925 by architect Clough Williams-Ellis (1883 – 1978) from his uncle Sir Arthur Osmond Williams. Williams-Ellis renamed the site Portmeirion and embarked upon what was to become a 50-year project to create a compact coastal resort village 5 miles south west of his Plas Brondanw family home. The former Aber Iâ mansion was renovated and opened as a hotel in 1926. Development of the village, inspired by the Italian riviera, took place in two phases: from 1925 to 1939 and then from 1954 to 1976. 28 hectares of forest, known as Y Gwyllt, around the village were purchased in 1940.

Made famous by the 1967 Patrick McGoohan cult television series The Prisoner, Portmeirion is owned by the Clough Williams-Ellis Foundation charity and its cottages, which are all Grade II listed buildings, serve as hotel and self-catering accommodation. The village itself is also open to the public for day visits.

Further Reading

Portmeirion (Wikipedia);
Portmeirion Village (Official Site)

 

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Plas Brondanw

Plas Brondanw

Plas Brondanw

Date

5 July 2014
Location

Plas Brondanw, Croesor

SH 61663 42355; 52.96065°N, 4.06098°W

Information

Plas Brondanw is a country house near the tiny village of Croesor and was home to architect Clough Williams-Ellis (1883 – 1978), best known for the Italianate village Portmeirion. Clough was given the property, which had been in his family for over 400 years, by his father in 1908. He married writer Amabel Strachey in 1915 and after the end of World War I he set about restoring the mansion as their home and designing its formal gardens. Further restoration work was completed in 1953 after the house had been damaged in a fire in 1951.

The Grade II* listed building and its gardens are in the care of the Clough Williams-Ellis Foundation, which is also responsible for Portmeirion and the Brondanw Estate. The gardens are open to the public.

Further Reading

Brondanw (official site);
Of Flowers and Follies: Plas Brondanw (Treasure Maps);
Clough Williams-Ellis (Wikipedia)

 

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