Conwy Suspension Bridge

Conwy Suspension Bridge

Conwy Suspension Bridge

Date

28 October 2015

Location

Conwy
SH 78582 77543; 53.28090°N, 3.82257°W

Information

Conwy Suspension Bridge was one of the world’s first road suspension bridges. Designed by Scottish engineer Thomas Telford (1757-1834), the bridge was built between 1822 and 1826 to carry the A5 road as part of the London-to-Dublin mail route. Its design is similar to that of the Menai Suspension Bridge – another of Telford’s creations – which was constructed at the same time and as part of the same route.

The bridge has a main span of 99.7 m and it crosses the Afon Conwy next to Conwy Castle. It replaced a ferry that operated at the same location.

The transport link across the river was augmented in 1849 when the tubular railway bridge alongside the road bridge was officially opened. The rail bridge carried the Chester and Holyhead Railway (now the North Wales Coast line) and was designed by Robert Stephenson (1803-1859). The wrought-iron box-girder construction is similar to that of his original Britannia Bridge, which opened in 1850, was destroyed by fire in 1970, and then rebuilt to a different design.

The narrow Conwy Suspension Bridge served as the main roadway into Conwy until it was superseded by a modern road bridge, which flanks the suspension bridge on the opposite side from the rail bridge, in 1958. The newer road bridge still carries local traffic, but was itself superseded when the A55 North Wales Expressway bypassed the town via the Conwy Tunnel, which was constructed between 1986 and 1991.

The suspension bridge is now only open to pedestrian traffic and is in the care of the National Trust. It was re-painted in 2007-2008 as part of a £400,000 renovation project. Both the suspension bridge and the adjacent railway bridge have Grade I listings.

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blinc

Exploring the sentiment of ‘Hireath’ (yearning), Alys Hughes dances to the backdrop of a projected animated film by Elly Strigner

Date

27 October 2012
Location

Conwy

SH 78110 77479; 53.28021°N, 3.82961°W

Information

blinc, Wales’ largest Contemporary Digital Arts Festival was held in Conwy on 26-28 October 2012. This year’s event was dedicated to Alan Turing as part of his centenary year.

blinc;
Blinc digital arts festival’s tribute to Alan Turing (BBC News, 27 Oct 2012)

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Gloddaeth Hall

Gloddaeth Hall

Date

27 November 2010
Location

Llanrhos, Conwy

SH 80281 80680; 53.30947°N, 3.79829°W

Further Information

Gloddaeth Hall is a grade 1 listed building and was a manor house belonging to the Mostyn family. The early 16th century Tudor hall was built for Margaret, heiress of the Gloddaeth estate, who married into the Mostyn family. The Hall now forms part of St David’s college, an independent boarding school founded in 1965.

St David’s College

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Bodysgallen Hall

Bodysgallen Hall

Date

27 November 2010
Location

Llanrhos, Conwy

SH 80040 79131; 53.29550°N, 3.80131°W

Further Information

Bodysgallen Hall was restored as a luxury hotel and spa by Historic House Hotels who donated the property to the National Trust in 2008. It is a grade 1 listed building and the majority of the manor house dates back to the 17th century. Previous owners of Bodysgallen have included the Mostyn and Wynn families.

Bodysgallen Hall & Spa; Bodysgallen Hall (Wikipedia)

Hanson jetty and conveyor, Llanddulas

Hanson jetty

Date

13 November 2010
Location

Llanddulas, Conwy

SH 89669 78537; 53.29226°N, 3.65671°W Jetty
SH 89698 78200; 53.28923°N, 3.65614°W Llysfaen Quarry

Further Information

The jetty, owned by Hanson, closed in 1993. The conveyor runs from Llysfaen Quarry (a former limestone quarry) though a tunnel below the A547 to a works on the north side of the road. It then carries on under the A55 and the railway down to the jetty.

Nearby to the west, the Raynes jetty, owned by Cemex, is still in operation. Its conveyor transports limestone aggregates straight from Raynes Quarry to vessels berthed at the jetty for loading.

The dolosse are interlocking concrete blocks acting as a defence against coastal erosion. They were first developed in South Africa in 1963 and act by dissipating the energy of the waves.

Cemex jetty (Ports and Harbours of the UK); Dolos (Wikipedia)

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Rhyd-y-foel

Craig y Forwyn from Rhyd-y-foel

Date

13 November 2010
Location

Rhyd-y-foel, Conwy

SH 91050 76898; 53.27782°N, 3.63543°W

Further Information

The village of Rhyd-y-foel nestles in the valley of the Afon Dulas, between Pen-y-corddyn-mawr and Mynydd Marian. Just beyond the crags lies Llanddulas Quarry, one of several limestone quarries in the area.

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