Chinese Walking Stick Bamboo

Chinese Walking Stick Bamboo

Date

17 October 2020

Location

Bog Garden, Treborth Botanic Garden,
Treborth, Bangor
SH 55240 71098; 53.21714°N, 4.16947°W

Information

Chimonobambusa tumidissinosa
Chinese Walking Stick Bamboo
From Southwest Sichuan and northeast Yunnan (China), has been used for walking sticks since the Han Dynasty. Edible shoots.”

Further Reading

Treborth Botanic Garden

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Plas Tan y Bwlch – Snowdonia National Park Environmental Studies Centre

Plas Tan y Bwlch

Date

22 August 2017

Location

Plas Tan y Bwlch, Maentwrog, Vale of Ffestiniog
SH 65548 40623; 52.94608°N, 4.00245°W

Information

The first manor house on the Tan y Bwlch estate is thought to have been built in the 17th century by Evan Evans, who was Sheriff of Merionethshire in 1635. In around 1748 the house was rebuilt by Robert Griffith, grandson of the Evans heiress Catherine. In turn the Griffith family male line also came to an end and Robert’s granddaughter Margaret inherited the estate. In 1789 she married William Oakeley from Staffordshire. The Oakeley family was involved in many developments in the local area, including agricultural land improvement, slate quarrying in Blaenau Ffesiniog, and the creation of the Ffestiniog Railway. The family owned the estate until 1961.

Meirionnydd County Council purchased the house and grounds in 1969 and in 1975 it was opened as the Study Centre by the Snowdonia National Park Authority. Renovations of the property and gardens funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and CADW were carried out in 2004-05.

Further Reading

Plas Tan y Bwlch (Snowdonia National Park)

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Treborth Botanic Garden

Treborth Botanic Garden

Date

20 May 2017

Location

Treborth, Bangor
SH 55240 71098; 53.21714°N, 4.16947°W

Information

The land for Treborth Botanic Garden was purchased by Bangor University in the 1960s in order to develop a plant collection for its Botany Department. The garden had previously been developed in the 1840s as part of the Chester and Holyhead Railway’s planned tourist destination Britannia Park. This was designed by architect and gardener Sir Joseph Paxton (1803 – 1865) – best known for designing the 1851 Great Exhibition’s Crystal Palace. However, lack of funding led to the project being abandoned.

The botanic garden is host to more than 2,000 native and exotic species and the university maintains six glasshouses on the site. The university provides free access to the grounds to the public throughout the year.

Further Reading

Treborth Botanic Garden

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Furnace Hill, Bodnant Garden

View of Bodnant House and the Terraces from Lady’s Seat, Furnace Hill

Date

30 April 2017

Location

Bodnant Garden, Tal y Cafn, Conwy
SH 80019 72289; 53.23402°N, 3.79903°W

Information

In April 2017 8 hectares (20 acres) of previously private woodland were opened to the public at Bodnant Garden. The opening of Furnace Meadow and Furnace Hill was the culmination of a 10-year renovation project carried out to counter the effects of decline and disease in the area. The area is named after a blast furnace that operated there in the 18th century. With other previously private sections – Old Park Meadow, Yew Dell and The Far End – having been opened between 2013 and 2015, over 90% of the grounds are now accessible. A final area, Heather Hill, is scheduled to open in 2020.

Further Reading

Other posts in the Bodnant Garden series…
Welcome to Furnace Wood and Meadow (Bodnant Garden Blog)

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Plas Cadnant

Plas Cadnant

Plas Cadnant

Date

13 September 2015

Location

Plas Cadnant, Menai Bridge, Anglesey
SH 55636 73309; 53.23711°N, 4.16454°W

Information

Plas Cadnant manor house was built in 1803 by John Price the younger (1780-1855), agent to the Marquess of Anglesey. The neo-classical Georgian house, which received a Grade II listing in 1967, was set in an estate comprising gardens and parkland on the west bank of the Afon Cadnant about half a mile from its estuary on the Menai Strait. The estate remained in the Price family until after the First World War when it was divided up and sold to different owners.

The current 80-hectare private estate was purchased in 1996 by former Staffordshire-based farmer Anthony Tavernor, who first of all renovated and converted the house’s outbuildings into five self-catering holiday cottages. In 1997 he then embarked upon the long-term and continuing project of restoring the gardens which had been neglected for over 70 years. The gardens were opened to the public in 2011.

Further Reading

Plas Cadnant;
Gardens to visit: Plas Cadnant, Anglesey (The Telegraph, 8 July 2011)

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Harmony Garden

Harmony Garden

Harmony Garden

Date

23 August 2015

Location

Melrose, Scottish Borders
NT 54706 34245; 55.59968°N, 2.72038°W

Information

Robert Waugh, a local joiner, built Harmony Mansion around 1807 and its design was inspired by his house on his allspice plantation in Jamaica. The property was left to the National Trust for Scotland in 1996, having belonged to the Pitman family since 1820. The restored mansion is now let as self-catering holiday accommodation for up to 12 guests and its 1.5 hectare walled garden is open to visitors.

Further Reading

Harmony Garden (National Trust for Scotland)

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Llanidan House Garden

Llanidan House

Llanidan House

Date

4 July 2015

Location

Llanidan, Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
SH 49436 66890; 53.17773°N, 4.25435°W

Information

The walled garden of Llanidan House (also known as Llanidan Hall or Plas Llanidan) is open to the public three times a year under the National Garden Scheme. The garden and grounds date back to the development of the property in the 17th century, although the original layout was lost when the garden was ploughed over after the Second World War. It was restored from being completely overgrown in the 1980s.

The estate was the location of a monastery in the 14th century and was purchased from the crown in 1606 by Beaumaris MP Richard ap Rhydderch (Richard Prytherch). When Prytherch’s great-great-grandson Thomas Lloyd died in 1740 the estate was sold to Henry Paget (1744-1812), 1st Earl of Uxbridge, who left it to his nephew Sir William Irby (1707-1775), 2nd Baronet and later 1st Baron Boston. The property remained in the Boston family until it was sold in 1958.

The Grade II* listed Old St Nidan’s Church, which is adjacent to Llanidan House, is on the site of a church said to have been founded by the Welsh saint Nidan in the 7th century. The existing structure dates back to the 14th century. A new anglican church also dedicated to St Nidan was built between 1839 and 1843 about half a mile away on the main Brynsiencyn road. The old church, which was in need of repair, was partially demolished and its contents moved to the new church built to serve the growing population of Brynsiencyn. Amongst the items transferred was a 66 cm-long sandstone chest found below the altar in 1700 by Henry Rowlands (1655-1723), rector of St Nidan’s from 1696, which was thought to contain the remains of Nidan. There is a story from the 12th century of a mystical stone in the form of a human thigh, which would magically return to the church by the following day no matter how far it was taken away. This stone came to be embedded (for safe keeping, one presumes!) in the wall of the churchyard. Its magical properties must have become somewhat diminished, however, as Rowlands later reported that it had been stolen.

The old church was never deconsecrated and was bought in 1994. It was restored by the owners of Llanidan House as a private chapel and is open to the public at the same time as the garden.

Further Reading

Llanidan Hall (National Gardens Scheme);
Llanidan Hall (British Listed Buildings);
St Nidan’s Church, Llanidan (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales)

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Plas Brondanw

Plas Brondanw

Plas Brondanw

Date

5 July 2014
Location

Plas Brondanw, Croesor

SH 61663 42355; 52.96065°N, 4.06098°W

Information

Plas Brondanw is a country house near the tiny village of Croesor and was home to architect Clough Williams-Ellis (1883 – 1978), best known for the Italianate village Portmeirion. Clough was given the property, which had been in his family for over 400 years, by his father in 1908. He married writer Amabel Strachey in 1915 and after the end of World War I he set about restoring the mansion as their home and designing its formal gardens. Further restoration work was completed in 1953 after the house had been damaged in a fire in 1951.

The Grade II* listed building and its gardens are in the care of the Clough Williams-Ellis Foundation, which is also responsible for Portmeirion and the Brondanw Estate. The gardens are open to the public.

Further Reading

Brondanw (official site);
Of Flowers and Follies: Plas Brondanw (Treasure Maps);
Clough Williams-Ellis (Wikipedia)

 

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