Gerlan after Emma

‘International’, at the old Pumping Station, looking towards the Glyderau

Date

2 March 2018

Location

Gerlan, Bethesda
SH 63330 66572; 53.17863°N, 4.04646°W

Information

After the ‘Beast from the East’ and Storm Emma.

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Llyn Ogwen Pillbox I

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Date

18 May 2013
Location

Llyn Ogwen

SH 65486 60489; 53.12454°N, 4.01166°W

Information

With the fall of France and the defeat of the British Expeditionary Force in 1940, Germany, in the hope that Britain would surrender, made threats of imminent invasion. Turning the initial bluff into reality would, however, have taken a certain period of preparation, as Britain’s naval and air forces presented a formidable obstacle to mounting the threatened ground assault (codenamed Operation Sea Lion). Nonetheless, in the face of such threats, Britain undertook a major programme of constructing anti-invasion defences during 1940 and 1941. This involved building a network of coastal defences, backed up by a series of ‘stop lines’. Exploiting both natural and man-made barriers, such as rivers and railway cuttings, the stop lines were intended to slow down the advance inland of any invading force. The stop lines were reinforced with additional obstacles such as anti-tank blocks, barbed-wire entanglements, ditches and minefields, and were defended by gun emplacements and pillboxes.

The pillbox at Llyn Ogwen, protecting the A5 road, was part of Western Command’s network of stop lines in Wales, intended to defend against a possible German invasion coming via Ireland.

British anti-invasion preparations of the Second World War (Wikipedia)

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Cwm Idwal

Cwm Idwal, with Devil's Kitchen in the background

Date

13 August 2011
Location

Cwm Idwal, Glyderau

SH 64225 59338; 53.11388°N, 4.03001°W

Information

Cwm Idwal is a north-facing glaciated hanging valley in the Glyderau range of mountains in Snowdonia. There is a lake, Llyn Idwal, in the cwm, which is named after Idwal ab Owain Gwynedd — illegitimate son of the Welsh prince Owain Gwynedd ap Gruffydd (c. 1100-1170) — who was, according to legend, murdered by being drowned in the lake. The conspicuous gully in the crags above the cwm between the peaks of Glyder Fawr and Y Garn is known as Twll Du (‘black hole’) or The Devil’s Kitchen — the mist often seen hanging above it having been likened in the past to a diabolical cloud of smoke.

Llyn Idwal;
Frozen Llyn Idwal

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Panorama of the Glyderau from Carnedd Dafydd

Panoramic view from close to the summit of Carnedd Daffydd

Date

2 May 2011
Location

Carnedd Dafydd, Carneddau

SH 66142 62941; 53.14672°N, 4.00290°W

Information

With an elevation of 1044 m, Carnedd Dafydd is the fourth highest peak in Wales (when Garnedd Ugain in the Snowdon massif is included). The name of the mountain means David’s Cairn, probably in honour of Dafydd ap Gruffudd, younger brother of the last independent prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. Dafydd was captured in 1283 and taken to Shrewsbury where he was hanged, drawn and quartered.

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Blaen-y-nant Molybdenum Mine, Nant Ffrancon

Upper level, Blaen-y-nant Molybdenum Trial

Date

17 April 2011
Location

Blaen-y-nant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 64062 61139; 53.13001°N, 4.03321°W

Information

In his 1802 Observations of the Snowdon Mountains, William Williams noted:

A little below Blaen y Nant farm-house there is, at the foot of a high rock, a large body of some mineral matter, not unlike to what miners describe by the name Molubdena

The trial molybdenite (molybdenum sulphide) workings are on two levels. A short adit on the upper level leads to a small stoped out chamber.

William Williams, Observations of the Snowdon Mountains (Google Books); 
Molybdenite, Mineralogy of Wales (National Museum Wales); 
The Ogwen Valley Igneous Intrusions (North Wales Geology Association)

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Cwm Ceunant Copper Mine

Looking over to the Carneddau from the middle adit

Date

19 February 2011
Location

Cwm Ceunant, Carnedd y Filiast

SH 62563 63756; 53.15314°N, 4.05673°W

Further Information

Spoil heaps for the workings, which were on three levels, are visible from Lon Las Ogwen on the valley floor. The mine is on the 350m contour in Cwm Ceunant, on the slopes of Carnedd y Filiast in the Glyderau range. Although the entrance to the bottom adit is completely covered over by a waste heap, the entrances to the middle and top adits are still clear.

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