Coetmor Church

Coetmor Church

Date

2 May 2020

Location

Ffordd Coetmor, Bethesda
SH 61785 67731; 53.18864°N, 4.07006°W

Information

Coetmor Church is an Anglican chapel of ease. Its churchyard is adjecent to the nonconformist burial ground Coetmor Cemetery.

Further Reading

Coetmor Cemetery

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Kilmartin Grave Slabs

Kilmartin Grave Slabs

Date

23 August 2018

Location

Kilmartin, Argyll and Bute
NR 83445 98841; 56.13297°N, 5.48649°W

Information

Kilmartin Stones are a collection of decoratively carved grave-cover slabs dating from the 13th to the 18th centuries. 23 slabs are on view in a shelter in the churchyard of Kilmartin Parish Church. Such grave covers were something of a status symbol for the local West Highland warrior class, with common themes for the carvings being swords and effigies. Other common motifs include hunting scenes, shears and fabulous animals.

The stones were moved inside a shelter in 1956 to protect them from the weather. This lapidarium was originally a mausoleum and was built in 1627 for Neil Campbell, Bishop of Argyll, and his wife Christine, daughter of John Carswell, who built Carnasserie Castle.

The collection is in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

Further Reading

Kilmartin Stones (Historic Environment Scotland)

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Luss Parish Church

Luss Parish Church

Date

20 August 2018

Location

Luss, Argyll and Bute
NS 36109 92861; 56.10031°N, 4.63650°W

Information

Luss Parish Church was built in 1875 by Sir James Colquhoun (1844-1907), 5th Baronet Colquhoun of Luss, as a memorial to his father who drowned in Loch Lomond in 1873 on the way back from a hunting trip.

Further Reading

Loch Lomond, Luss

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Anfield Cemetery, Liverpool

Anfield Cemetery

Date

16 February 2018

Location

Walton Lane, Liverpool
SJ 36168 93889; 53.43788°N, 2.96235°W

Information

Covering an area of 57 hectares, Anfield Cemetery was designed by landscape architect Edward Kemp (1817-1891) and opened in 1863. Anfield was the second municipal cemetery to be opened by Liverpool Corporation outside of the city centre, where the existing burial grounds had become overcrowded.

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Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Date

2 May 2016

Location

Pentre Uchaf, Llanfairfechan
SH 68255 74469; 53.25081°N, 3.97609°W

Information

Erw Feiriol Cemetery in Llanfairfechan is in the care of Conwy County Borough Council. The land for the cemetery was purchased by The Burial Board of Llanfairfechan after the parish passed a resolution to provide a local burial ground in 1878.

Further Reading

Llanfairfechan;
More posts in the Llanfairfechan series

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St Mary’s Churchyard, Llanfairfechan

St Mary's Church, Llanfairfechan

St Mary’s Church, Llanfairfechan

Date

2 May 2016

Location

Pentre Uchaf, Llanfairfechan
SH 68300 74541; 53.25147°N, 3.97543°W

Information

The English translation of the place name Llanfairfechan is little church of St Mary. St Mary’s parish church was built there on the site of an earlier church in 1849. It was designed by diocesan architect Henry Kennedy (1814-1898). Kennedy was born in London and settled in Bangor after training as an architect. His career in church architecture was prolific and spanned some 50 years. The old parish church, which is a Grade II listed building, closed in 1999. The historic dedication to St Mary was then transferred to the nearby Christ Church. The latter, which is also a Grade II listed building, was built in 1864, the construction being funded by landowner John Platt (1817-1872) of Bryn-y-Neuadd Hall. As an anglican place of worship, it was built to cater for English tourists visiting the town and also to oppose to the growing number of nonconformist chapels in the area.

Further Reading

Llanfairfechan;
More posts in the Llanfairfechan series

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Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Date

20 February 2016

Location

Llansadwrn, Anglesey
SH 55365 75877; 53.26011°N, 4.16978°W

Information

The Grade II listed celtic cross at St Sadwrn’s Church in Llansadwrn, Anglesey commemorates Hugh Stewart McCorquodale (1874-1900) who, only the day after joining Thornycroft’s Mounted Infantry as a lieutenant in Natal, died at Spion Kop during the Second Boer War (1899-1902) and was buried at the battlefield.

Hugh was educated at Harrow School and graduated with a BA from Cambridge University in 1897. He was the youngest son of George McCorquodale (1817-1895) and the latter’s second wife Emily Sanderson (b 1838). The McCorquodales lived in Newton-le-Willows (in Lancashire at the time, but nowadays in Merseyside) and they also had a country house at Gadlys, not far from St Sadwrn’s Church.

George started a stationery business in Liverpool in 1841 and in 1846 founded printers McCorquodale & Co Ltd in Newton-le-Willows. The successful business expanded with premises opening in the 1870s in London, Glasgow and Wolverton, Milton Keynes. As Lieutenant Colonel, George also commanded the ‘McCorquodales’ rifle volunteer corps, which was formed in 1859. This was one of the many irregular units formed independently of the British Army in the 1850s in response to the perceived threat of invasion from France.

The celtic cross was designed by Liverpool-born architect and archaeologist Henry Harold Hughes (1864-1940), who had opened a practice in Bangor in 1892 and had been appointed as Bangor’s diocesan surveyor and architect in 1900. The cross was erected by public subscription and the Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial Fund, founded in 1901, is today part of Lloyd’s Patriotic Fund charity group.

Further Reading

St Sadwrn’s Church;
Commemorative cross at Church of St Sadwrn, Cwm Cadnant (British Listed Buildings)

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Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Date

6 February 2016

Location

Llansadwrn, Anglesey
SH 55365 75877; 53.26011°N, 4.16978°W

Information

Llansadwrn, situated in Cwn Cadnant on the Isle of Anglesey, is named after St Sadwrn’s Church, which was founded around 500 CE. The present building, erected on the foundations of its medieval precursor, was designed by diocesan architect Henry Kennedy and built in 1881. The church received a Grade II* listing in 1968.

After leaving the military, Sadwrn Farchog (Sadwrn the Knight) came to Wales from Brittany and established a church in what was to become Llansadwrn in Carmarthenshire. He later moved north to Anglesey, where he lived as hermit. A 6th century memorial stone bearing his name was discovered in 1742 and is now set into a wall inside the Anglesey church. Sadwrn’s name in Latin is Saturninus, which can lead to his confusion with various other saints with the same name.

Further Reading

Church of St Sadwrn, Cwm Cadnant (British Listed Buildings)

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Cockpen Churchyard

Cockpen Churchyard

Cockpen Churchyard

Date

25 December 2015

Location

Cockpen, Bonnyrigg
NT 31906 64223; 55.86633°N, 3.08963°W

Information

Cockpen Parish Church, situated to the south of the town of Bonnyrigg, was designed in 1816 by Scottish architect Richard Crichton (c 1771-1817), who had trained under John and Robert Adam and was a burgess of the city of Edinburgh. Following his death, however, the church was built between 1817 and 1820 by his former apprentices the brothers Richard and Robert Dickson, who took over his practice and completed a number of other unfinished projects.

In 1975 the nearby parish of Carrington, whose church building was later converted for commercial use, was merged with Cockpen. Cockpen Church is owned by The Church of Scotland and is still in use, although the position of Minister is currently vacant. The church is a Category A listed building.

Further Reading

Cockpen and Carrington Parish Church (Wikipedia)

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St Nidan’s Church, Brynsiencyn

St Nidan's Church, Brynsiencyn

St Nidan’s Church, Brynsiencyn

Date

11 July 2015

Location

Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
SH 48929 67415; 53.18231°N, 4.26217°W

Information

The anglican St Nidan’s Church on the outskirts of Brynsiencyn was built between 1839 and 1843 to supersede the old church about half a mile away in Llanidan. The church is dedicated to the 7th century Welsh saint who was associated with the monastery in Penmon. The original plans included a spire but this was never built and the design of the church, by architect John Welch, proved to be highly controversial at the time. The church belongs to The Church in Wales and is a Grade II listed building.

Further Reading

Old St Nidan’s Church;
Church of St. Nidan (new church) (British Listed Buildings);
St Nidan’s Church (Wikipedia)

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St Michael’s Church (Llanfihangel Dinsylwy)

St Michael's Church

St Michael’s Church (Llanfihangel Dinsylwy)

Date

10 July 2015

Location

Tan-Dinas, Llanddona, Anglesey
SH 58807 81487; 53.31142°N, 4.12071°W

Information

St Michael’s is a former parish church dating back to the 15th century built on the remote site of an earlier church. It is known in Welsh as Llanfihangel Dinsylwy (Mihangel is Welsh for Michael) and is situated below Din Sylwy, a 164 m high, flat-topped limestone hill near Llanddona that is also known as Bwrdd Arthur (Arthur’s Table). Din Sylwy is the location of a hill fort thought to have been created in the Iron Age and re-occupied in Roman times. The church is of a simple two-part plan, consisting of a nave and narrower chancel. It is a Grade II* listed building owned by the Church in Wales and is part of the parish of Beaumaris.

Further Reading

St Michael’s Church (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales);
Church of St Michael, Llanddona (British Listed Buildings)

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Llanidan House Garden

Llanidan House

Llanidan House

Date

4 July 2015

Location

Llanidan, Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
SH 49436 66890; 53.17773°N, 4.25435°W

Information

The walled garden of Llanidan House (also known as Llanidan Hall or Plas Llanidan) is open to the public three times a year under the National Garden Scheme. The garden and grounds date back to the development of the property in the 17th century, although the original layout was lost when the garden was ploughed over after the Second World War. It was restored from being completely overgrown in the 1980s.

The estate was the location of a monastery in the 14th century and was purchased from the crown in 1606 by Beaumaris MP Richard ap Rhydderch (Richard Prytherch). When Prytherch’s great-great-grandson Thomas Lloyd died in 1740 the estate was sold to Henry Paget (1744-1812), 1st Earl of Uxbridge, who left it to his nephew Sir William Irby (1707-1775), 2nd Baronet and later 1st Baron Boston. The property remained in the Boston family until it was sold in 1958.

The Grade II* listed Old St Nidan’s Church, which is adjacent to Llanidan House, is on the site of a church said to have been founded by the Welsh saint Nidan in the 7th century. The existing structure dates back to the 14th century. A new anglican church also dedicated to St Nidan was built between 1839 and 1843 about half a mile away on the main Brynsiencyn road. The old church, which was in need of repair, was partially demolished and its contents moved to the new church built to serve the growing population of Brynsiencyn. Amongst the items transferred was a 66 cm-long sandstone chest found below the altar in 1700 by Henry Rowlands (1655-1723), rector of St Nidan’s from 1696, which was thought to contain the remains of Nidan. There is a story from the 12th century of a mystical stone in the form of a human thigh, which would magically return to the church by the following day no matter how far it was taken away. This stone came to be embedded (for safe keeping, one presumes!) in the wall of the churchyard. Its magical properties must have become somewhat diminished, however, as Rowlands later reported that it had been stolen.

The old church was never deconsecrated and was bought in 1994. It was restored by the owners of Llanidan House as a private chapel and is open to the public at the same time as the garden.

Further Reading

Llanidan Hall (National Gardens Scheme);
Llanidan Hall (British Listed Buildings);
St Nidan’s Church, Llanidan (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales)

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Beaumaris Cemetery

Beaumaris Cemetery

Beaumaris Cemetery

Date

12 April 2015
Location

Beaumaris, Anglesey

SH 59930 75606; 53.25890°N, 4.10127°W

Information

Beaumaris Cemetery was designed by architect J Francis Clerke and was built between June 1862 and April 1863 on a plot of land given to the town council by Sir Richard Bulkeley Williams-Bulkeley (1801-1875), 10th Baronet, of Baron Hill, who was at the time Member of Parliament for Anglesey and Lord Lieutenant of Caernarvonshire. The cemetery chapel was consecrated in July 1863 by the Bishop of Bangor, James Colquhoun Cambell (1813-1895).

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