Liverpool Cathedral

Liverpool Cathedral

Date

15 February 2018

Location

St James’s Mount, Liverpool
SJ 35385 89411; 53.39754°N, 2.97321°W

Information

Liverpool Cathedral;
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Liverpool Cathedral

View from the tower looking down towards the Chapter House

Date

22 October 2011
Location

St James’s Mount, Liverpool

SJ 35385 89411; 53.39754°N, 2.97321°W

Information

With an overall external length, including the annexed Lady Chapel, of 189 m (620 ft), Liverpool Cathedral is the longest in the world. Officially known as the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool, it is the seat of the Anglican Bishop of Liverpool. The long axis of the building is aligned North-South, with liturgical East and West therefore corresponding to geographical South and North, respectively.

In 1901 it was decided to hold an open competition for designs for a Church of England cathedral for Liverpool. In 1903 a proposal by 22-year-old architect Giles Gilbert Scott was selected and the following year the foundation stone was laid by Edward VII.

The first part of the building to be finished was the Lady Chapel, which was dedicated in 1910. Around this time, Scott substantially revised his plans for the rest of the structure. Originally conceived as having two towers at the West end and a single transept, the cathedral was now to figure a single, central tower and twin transepts.

Progress was disrupted by the First Word War, and the next section, comprising the High Altar, Chancel and Eastern Transepts, was consecrated as the Cathedral Church of Christ in Liverpool in 1924.

The next phase of construction was of the central section, and work was later hindered again, this time by the Second World War. Nevertheless, Scott performed the topping out ceremony to complete the 101 m (331 ft) tower in 1942.

Scott died in 1960, the year before the Bridge and the first bay of the Nave were finished. Construction of the rest of the cathedral was finally completed in 1978.

Liverpool Cathedral; Liverpool Cathedral (Wikipedia); Liturgical east and west;
David Sheppard (Wikipedia)

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