Llanllechid Churchyard

Llanllechid Churchyard

Llanllechid Churchyard

Date

30 November 2013
Location

Llanllechid, Gwynedd

SH 62223 68720; 53.19764°N, 4.06395°W

Information

Churchyard of St Llechid’s Church

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Churchyard of St Llechid’s Church, Llanllechid

Cross, towards Moel y Ci

Date

21 January 2012
Location

Llanllechid, Gwynedd

SH 62223 68720; 53.19764°N, 4.06395°W

Information

The Grade II listed church in Llanllechid — dedicated to Llechid, a sixth-century female Welsh saint — was built in 1844 at a cost of around £2500 to replace an earlier church dating back to the late 15th century which stood nearby. The newer church was constructed in a neo-Norman style from local granite and limestone and is an early example of the work of diocesan architect Henry Kennedy. The design was controversial at the time and met with some criticism.

Although the churchyard is still owned by The Church In Wales, the church itself was closed around 2002 and in October 2010 Gwynedd Council conditionally approved plans to convert it into a three-bedroom dwelling.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales, Samuel Lewis, 1849 (British History Online);
St Llechid’s Church (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales)

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Bryn Hafod-y-wern Slate Quarry

Launder pillars on the waste heap with Moel Wnion shrouded in mist in the background

Date

5 March 2011
Location

Bryn Hafod-y-wern, Llanllechid

SH 63219 69223; 53.20242°N, 4.04926°W

Information

The quarry was operated by the Pennant family from the 1780s. The lease passed out of the hands of the Penrhyn estate in the 1820s and the Royal Bangor Slate Company, established in London in 1845, later took over. Plans to connect the quarry to the Chester-Holyhead railway at Abergwyngregyn came to nothing, and the quarry was also affected by industrial unrest in the 1880s. Water to power the quarry came from Cwm Caseg via a leat five miles long. The water supply was cut off in 1889.

The hazardous flooded quarry pit is 50m deep and contains dumped unexploded World War II bombs and barbed wire. It is also the grave of a diver who died there in the 1970s.

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