Carnedd y Filiast

View of the Glyderau mountain range from the summit of Carnedd y Filiast, looking from the southeast (left) to the southwest (right)

View of the Glyderau mountain range from the summit of Carnedd y Filiast, looking from the southeast (left) to the southwest (right)

Date

7 June 2013
Location

Carnedd y Filiast, Glyderau

SH 62046 62782; 53.14425°N, 4.06403°W

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Panorama of the Glyderau from Carnedd Dafydd

Panoramic view from close to the summit of Carnedd Daffydd

Date

2 May 2011
Location

Carnedd Dafydd, Carneddau

SH 66142 62941; 53.14672°N, 4.00290°W

Information

With an elevation of 1044 m, Carnedd Dafydd is the fourth highest peak in Wales (when Garnedd Ugain in the Snowdon massif is included). The name of the mountain means David’s Cairn, probably in honour of Dafydd ap Gruffudd, younger brother of the last independent prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. Dafydd was captured in 1283 and taken to Shrewsbury where he was hanged, drawn and quartered.

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Blaen-y-nant Molybdenum Mine, Nant Ffrancon

Upper level, Blaen-y-nant Molybdenum Trial

Date

17 April 2011
Location

Blaen-y-nant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 64062 61139; 53.13001°N, 4.03321°W

Information

In his 1802 Observations of the Snowdon Mountains, William Williams noted:

A little below Blaen y Nant farm-house there is, at the foot of a high rock, a large body of some mineral matter, not unlike to what miners describe by the name Molubdena

The trial molybdenite (molybdenum sulphide) workings are on two levels. A short adit on the upper level leads to a small stoped out chamber.

William Williams, Observations of the Snowdon Mountains (Google Books); 
Molybdenite, Mineralogy of Wales (National Museum Wales); 
The Ogwen Valley Igneous Intrusions (North Wales Geology Association)

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Gwaith Copper Mine

Looking along Nant Ffrancon towards Tryfan

Date

26 February 2011
Location

Gwaith, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63026 63217; 53.14842°N, 4.04957°W

Information

In 1782 the Parys Mine Company discovered a vein of copper ore at this site. The main workings were below the old road close to the now ruined house Gwaith-maen. The yield from the mine amounted to only a few tons. A little higher up the slope of Carnedd y Filiast, below Cwm Graianog, an adit some 30 yards or so long was driven.

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Ceunant Arsenic Mine

Entrance to the adit, on the banks of the Ogwen

Date

26 February 2011
Location

Ceunant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63315 64620; 53.16109°N, 4.04585°W

Information

The adit is on the banks of the river Ogwen, close the Arsenic flues. It is now flooded and, at least, partially blocked by various items of rubbish.

Explorations were made at this site in about 1760 by locals, and around 1837 an English company resumed mining activity here, which was stopped because of skin complaints and the pollution of the Afon Ogwen.

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Arsenic Flues, Ceunant

Arsenic Flue, Ceunant

Date

19 February 2011
Location

Ceunant, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63244 64563; 53.16056°N, 4.04689°W

Further Information

These cut-and-cover flues would have radiated from a central point where a furnace would have been employed to produce arsenic from the ore mined at workings close by. The life expectancy of the workers employed in this task would not have been very long! Explorations were made at this site in about 1760 by locals, and around 1837 an English company resumed mining activity here, which was stopped because of skin complaints and the pollution of the Afon Ogwen.

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