Coetmor Church

Coetmor Church

Date

2 May 2020

Location

Ffordd Coetmor, Bethesda
SH 61785 67731; 53.18864°N, 4.07006°W

Information

Coetmor Church is an Anglican chapel of ease. Its churchyard is adjecent to the nonconformist burial ground Coetmor Cemetery.

Further Reading

Coetmor Cemetery

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St Chad’s Church, Shrewsbury

St Chad’s Church, Shrewsbury

Date

24 August 2017

Location

St Chad’s Terrace, Shrewsbury
SJ 48816 12422; 52.70702°N, 2.75899°W

Information

The Church of England’s St Chad’s Church opened on 19 August 1792 and has recently celebrated its 225th birthday. The present building, designed by Scottish architect George Steuart (1730-1806), repaced the earlier 13th century chruch dedicated to St Chad.

St Chad’s is a Grade 1 listed building.

Additional trivia: Charles Darwin (1809-1882) was baptised in St Chad’s on November 15th 1809.

Further Reading

St Chad’s;
St Chad’s Church, Shrewsbury (Wikipedia)

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St Pio’s Cafe

St Pio's Cafe

St Pio’s Cafe

Date

27 August 2016

Location

Pantasaph, Flintshire
SJ 15976 76005; 53.27433°N, 3.26147°W

Information

St Pio’s Cafe is located in the St Pio Peace Centre at the Franciscan Friary in Pantasaph. The small tea room there had fallen into a state of disrepair and was relaunched as the current cafe in 2015.

St David’s Church in Pantasaph was designed by London-based architect Thomas Henry Wyatt (1807-1880) and was built 1849-1852. It was originally intended as an Anglican church for the village but following the conversion in 1850 of the donors – Rudolph William Basil Fielding (1823-1892), who became the 8th Earl of Denbigh in 1865, and his first wife Louisa Pennant (1828-1853) – it was donated to the Roman Catholic Church and it became the mother house of the Friars Minor Capuchin of Great Britain, who had had no permanent base until that time. The church was adapted for Catholic use by architect Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin (1812-1852), himself a Roman Catholic convert. The adjacent Friary was built between 1858 and 1865 and is now a Franciscan Retreat Centre. Both the church and friary are Grade II* listed buildings.

Further Reading

St Pio’s Cafe;
Pantasaph Franciscan Friary

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Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial

Date

20 February 2016

Location

Llansadwrn, Anglesey
SH 55365 75877; 53.26011°N, 4.16978°W

Information

The Grade II listed celtic cross at St Sadwrn’s Church in Llansadwrn, Anglesey commemorates Hugh Stewart McCorquodale (1874-1900) who, only the day after joining Thornycroft’s Mounted Infantry as a lieutenant in Natal, died at Spion Kop during the Second Boer War (1899-1902) and was buried at the battlefield.

Hugh was educated at Harrow School and graduated with a BA from Cambridge University in 1897. He was the youngest son of George McCorquodale (1817-1895) and the latter’s second wife Emily Sanderson (b 1838). The McCorquodales lived in Newton-le-Willows (in Lancashire at the time, but nowadays in Merseyside) and they also had a country house at Gadlys, not far from St Sadwrn’s Church.

George started a stationery business in Liverpool in 1841 and in 1846 founded printers McCorquodale & Co Ltd in Newton-le-Willows. The successful business expanded with premises opening in the 1870s in London, Glasgow and Wolverton, Milton Keynes. As Lieutenant Colonel, George also commanded the ‘McCorquodales’ rifle volunteer corps, which was formed in 1859. This was one of the many irregular units formed independently of the British Army in the 1850s in response to the perceived threat of invasion from France.

The celtic cross was designed by Liverpool-born architect and archaeologist Henry Harold Hughes (1864-1940), who had opened a practice in Bangor in 1892 and had been appointed as Bangor’s diocesan surveyor and architect in 1900. The cross was erected by public subscription and the Hugh Stewart McCorquodale Memorial Fund, founded in 1901, is today part of Lloyd’s Patriotic Fund charity group.

Further Reading

St Sadwrn’s Church;
Commemorative cross at Church of St Sadwrn, Cwm Cadnant (British Listed Buildings)

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Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Eglwys Sadwrn Sant

Date

6 February 2016

Location

Llansadwrn, Anglesey
SH 55365 75877; 53.26011°N, 4.16978°W

Information

Llansadwrn, situated in Cwn Cadnant on the Isle of Anglesey, is named after St Sadwrn’s Church, which was founded around 500 CE. The present building, erected on the foundations of its medieval precursor, was designed by diocesan architect Henry Kennedy and built in 1881. The church received a Grade II* listing in 1968.

After leaving the military, Sadwrn Farchog (Sadwrn the Knight) came to Wales from Brittany and established a church in what was to become Llansadwrn in Carmarthenshire. He later moved north to Anglesey, where he lived as hermit. A 6th century memorial stone bearing his name was discovered in 1742 and is now set into a wall inside the Anglesey church. Sadwrn’s name in Latin is Saturninus, which can lead to his confusion with various other saints with the same name.

Further Reading

Church of St Sadwrn, Cwm Cadnant (British Listed Buildings)

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Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey

Date

23 August 2015

Location

Melrose, Scottish Borders
NT 54814 34114; 55.59852°N, 2.71864°W

Information

Melrose Abbey was founded by David I in 1136 and was the first Cistercian monastery in Scotland. The building was attacked several times by the English in the 14th century and following the assault in 1385 by Richard II’s forces, it had to be entirely rebuilt, which took about 100 years to complete. Various Scottish kings and nobles were buried in the abbey and it was also the resting place of the embalmed heart of Robert the Bruce.

Further Reading

Melrose Abbey (Historic Scotland);
Melrose Abbey (Wikipedia)

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St Nidan’s Church, Brynsiencyn

St Nidan's Church, Brynsiencyn

St Nidan’s Church, Brynsiencyn

Date

11 July 2015

Location

Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
SH 48929 67415; 53.18231°N, 4.26217°W

Information

The anglican St Nidan’s Church on the outskirts of Brynsiencyn was built between 1839 and 1843 to supersede the old church about half a mile away in Llanidan. The church is dedicated to the 7th century Welsh saint who was associated with the monastery in Penmon. The original plans included a spire but this was never built and the design of the church, by architect John Welch, proved to be highly controversial at the time. The church belongs to The Church in Wales and is a Grade II listed building.

Further Reading

Old St Nidan’s Church;
Church of St. Nidan (new church) (British Listed Buildings);
St Nidan’s Church (Wikipedia)

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St Michael’s Church (Llanfihangel Dinsylwy)

St Michael's Church

St Michael’s Church (Llanfihangel Dinsylwy)

Date

10 July 2015

Location

Tan-Dinas, Llanddona, Anglesey
SH 58807 81487; 53.31142°N, 4.12071°W

Information

St Michael’s is a former parish church dating back to the 15th century built on the remote site of an earlier church. It is known in Welsh as Llanfihangel Dinsylwy (Mihangel is Welsh for Michael) and is situated below Din Sylwy, a 164 m high, flat-topped limestone hill near Llanddona that is also known as Bwrdd Arthur (Arthur’s Table). Din Sylwy is the location of a hill fort thought to have been created in the Iron Age and re-occupied in Roman times. The church is of a simple two-part plan, consisting of a nave and narrower chancel. It is a Grade II* listed building owned by the Church in Wales and is part of the parish of Beaumaris.

Further Reading

St Michael’s Church (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales);
Church of St Michael, Llanddona (British Listed Buildings)

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Llanidan House Garden

Llanidan House

Llanidan House

Date

4 July 2015

Location

Llanidan, Brynsiencyn, Anglesey
SH 49436 66890; 53.17773°N, 4.25435°W

Information

The walled garden of Llanidan House (also known as Llanidan Hall or Plas Llanidan) is open to the public three times a year under the National Garden Scheme. The garden and grounds date back to the development of the property in the 17th century, although the original layout was lost when the garden was ploughed over after the Second World War. It was restored from being completely overgrown in the 1980s.

The estate was the location of a monastery in the 14th century and was purchased from the crown in 1606 by Beaumaris MP Richard ap Rhydderch (Richard Prytherch). When Prytherch’s great-great-grandson Thomas Lloyd died in 1740 the estate was sold to Henry Paget (1744-1812), 1st Earl of Uxbridge, who left it to his nephew Sir William Irby (1707-1775), 2nd Baronet and later 1st Baron Boston. The property remained in the Boston family until it was sold in 1958.

The Grade II* listed Old St Nidan’s Church, which is adjacent to Llanidan House, is on the site of a church said to have been founded by the Welsh saint Nidan in the 7th century. The existing structure dates back to the 14th century. A new anglican church also dedicated to St Nidan was built between 1839 and 1843 about half a mile away on the main Brynsiencyn road. The old church, which was in need of repair, was partially demolished and its contents moved to the new church built to serve the growing population of Brynsiencyn. Amongst the items transferred was a 66 cm-long sandstone chest found below the altar in 1700 by Henry Rowlands (1655-1723), rector of St Nidan’s from 1696, which was thought to contain the remains of Nidan. There is a story from the 12th century of a mystical stone in the form of a human thigh, which would magically return to the church by the following day no matter how far it was taken away. This stone came to be embedded (for safe keeping, one presumes!) in the wall of the churchyard. Its magical properties must have become somewhat diminished, however, as Rowlands later reported that it had been stolen.

The old church was never deconsecrated and was bought in 1994. It was restored by the owners of Llanidan House as a private chapel and is open to the public at the same time as the garden.

Further Reading

Llanidan Hall (National Gardens Scheme);
Llanidan Hall (British Listed Buildings);
St Nidan’s Church, Llanidan (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales)

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St Mary and St Nicholas Church, Beaumaris

Viscount Bulkeley Memorial

Viscount Bulkeley Memorial. The high-relief sculpture, situated in the chancel, is by Sir Richard Westmacott (1775-1856) of London, who was in his time Britain’s foremost sculptor of public statues. The inscription on the pedestal reads:

To the memory of him,
whose every action both of
public and private life,
was guided by sound principles
and kindest feelings,
this monument is erected
by his sincerely afflicted widow
Elizabeth Harriet
Viscountess Warren Bulkeley

——————

Thomas James
Viscount Warren Bulkeley
of Cashel, in the county of Tipperary,
in the Kingdom of Ireland;
Lord Lieutenant of
the county of Caernarvon;
Chamberlain and Chancellor
of North Wales;
and hereditary Constable
of Beaumaris Castle;
created an English Peer, May 11th 1784,
by the title of
Baron Bulkeley of Beaumaris;
He was born Decr 12th 1752:
and died June 3rd 1822.

(Westmacott was also the author of the Penrhyn Memorial in St Tegai’s Church in Llandygai.)

Date

25 April 2015
Location

Beaumaris, Anglesey

SH 60441 76152; 53.26393°N, 4.09386°W

Information

The town of Beaumaris was founded in 1296 following Edward I’s conquest of Wales. The church dedicated to Saints Mary and Nicholas was built around 1330 to serve the borough. The chancel is a 15th-century addition. Repairs were undertaken by Bangor architect John Hall (d 1828) in 1825 and restoration work was carried out in 1902 by London-based Gothic Revival architect George Frederick Bodley (1827-1907), who was also engaged in the same year by the 4th Earl of Powis for a major renovation of Powis Castle and Gardens. St Mary and St Nicholas is a parish church of The Church in Wales and is a Grade I listed building.

Further Reading

Church of SS Mary and Nicholas (British Listed Buildings);
St Mary’s and St Nicholas’s Church, Beaumaris (Our Heritage)

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Rehoboth Chapel, Nant Peris

Rehoboth Chapel

Rehoboth Chapel

Date

21 February 2015
Location

Nant Peris

SH 60551 58433; 53.10479°N, 4.08447°W

Information

The Welsh Calvinistic Methodists built a chapel in Nant Peris in 1833, which was rebuilt by Porthmadog architect Owen Morris Roberts in 1876. The name chosen for the chapel is a biblical placename from the Hebrew rehovot, meaning broad places. Capel Rehoboth received a Grade II listing in 1999 and is still used for Welsh-language services. It belongs to the Arfon Presbytery of the Presbyterian Church of Wales, the name officially adopted in 1928 by the nonconformist Welsh Calvinistic Methodists, who split from the Church of England in 1811.

Further Reading

Capel Rehoboth (British Listed Buildings)

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