Morfa Aber

Morfa Aber

Morfa Aber

Date

17 January 2016

Location

Abergwyngregyn
SH 64731 73133; 53.23793°N, 4.02829°W

Information

Morfa Aber is a nature reserve managed by Gwynedd Council and forms part of Traeth Lafan, the 9.5km-long expanse of intertidal sand- and mud-flats stretching from Llanfairfechan to Bangor. Traeth Lafan has been designated a Special Protection Area, a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Local Nature Reserve.

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Llanfairfechan

Llanfairfechan Beach

Llanfairfechan Beach – an expanse of sand is revealed at low tide

Date

29 November 2014
Location

Llanfairfechan

SH 67755 75290; 53.25807°N, 3.98392°W

Information

In the 1850s the village of Llanfairfechan had a population of around 800. It soon developed, however, into a popular Victorian seaside resort, thanks mainly to the arrival to the area of a couple of new landowners – Leicestershire solicitor Richard Luck purchased parts of Baron Hill estate from the Bulkeleys, and John Platt, a Yorkshire-born textile machinery manufacturer and Liberal politician from Oldham bought the Roberts estate. Platt rebuilt the derelict Bryn-y-Neuadd mansion there, which he completed around 1860. He also had the turnpike road moved away from his property and used his influence to have a railway station opened on his land for his travel convenience. The Chester and Holyhead Railway was built between 1844 and 1850 and a station in nearby Abergwyngregyn had opened in 1848. The station in Llanfairfechan opened in 1860, by which time the line was part of the London and North Western Railway. The seafront Promenade was also developed as the town became more popular with tourists. Platt additionally had plans for a marina. These were awaiting approval from Parliament, but were abandoned upon his death in 1872. An impressive harbour master’s residence had already been built for this and today it is used as holiday home.

Llanfairfechan now has a population of 3,600 and its Blue Flag beach, with its promenade, beach café, paddling pool, boating pool and water sports facilities, still attracts visitors. It is pebbly with a long expanse of sand uncovered at ebb tide, and the Morfa Madryn salt-marsh nature reserve is popular with bird watchers.

 

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Penrhyn Estate Bath House

Penrhyn Estate Bath House

Date

5 November 2011
Location

Penrhyn Estate, Bangor

SH 60523 73104; 53.23658°N, 4.09130°W

Information

The derelict bath house is at the end of an overgrown, 120 metre long jetty on the northern edge of the Penrhyn Estate between Abercegin and Aberogwen.

Bath House and Jetty, Penrhyn Estate (Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales)

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Penmon Point, Anglesey

Trwyn Du Lighthouse and Puffin Island from Penmon Point

Date

25 September 2010
Location

Penmon Point, Anglesey

SH 64095 81397 53.31200°N, 4.04136°W

Further Information

The 29 m tall Trwyn Du (Black Point) Lighthouse was established by Trinity House in 1838. It became unmanned in 1922 and in 1996 it was converted to use solar power.

Puffin Island (Ynys Seiriol) is privately owned by the Baron Hill Estate and is a Special Protection Area on account of its birdlife. The 6th century saint, Seiriol, founded a monastic community on the island, and there are ruins there of medieval buildings.

Trwyn Du Lighthouse (Trinity House)
Puffin Island, Anglesey (Wikipedia)

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