Fatlips Castle

Fatlips Castle

Fatlips Castle

Date

26 August 2015

Location

Minto Craigs, Scottish Borders
NT 58201 20870; 55.47982°N, 2.66288°W

Information

 

Fatlips Castle

“The original pele tower was built by the Turnbulls of Bedrule in the early 16th century, before being effectively destroyed by the Earl of Hertford in 1545. Very little remained.

“The castle was re-built in its current format in 1857 by the Elliots of Minto. It was modified to designs by the famous architect, Sir Robert Lorimer, in 1897 for the 4th Earl of Minto and was used as a museum until the late 1960s when it was closed and secured.

“The origin of the name is uncertain, but one idea is that it derives from the look of Turnbull of Barnhills. There are other stories, including that of a goat on the dunion which warned of the approaching English, or that gentlemen were traditionally allowed to kiss one of the ladies on entering.

“In 2011 Tweed Forum, with funding from Historic Scotland, the Elliots of Minto and Scottish Borders Council, commenced consolidation caused by major vandalism. The work was completed in March 2013 to the original Lorimer design.”

— Information plaque

Further Reading

Fatlips Castle
(Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland)
;
Fatlips Castle (Wikipedia)

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Wallace’s Statue, Dryburgh

Wallace's Statue, Dryburgh

Wallace’s Statue, Dryburgh

Date

25 August 2015

Location

Dryburgh, Scottish Borders
NT 59167 32684; 55.58605°N, 2.64935°W

Information

 
An Eccentric Vision

“Along this path a dramatic statue of William Wallace gazes out across the Tweed. This is just one of a number of features in the area built by David Stuart Erskine [1742-1829], the 11th Earl of Buchan: if you continue down the hill you can find another, the enchanting Temple of the Muses. The path to the statue is about one third of a mile, (ten to fifteen minutes’ walk) with a good surface all the way.

“The Earl was a vain, eccentric man, but he was passionate about conserving and recording anything to do with Scotland and its heroes. He was fascinated by Greek mythology too, and once held a party in his drawing room where he dressed up as the god Apollo on Mount Parnassus, with nine maidens to play the part of the Muses in attendance.

“He commissioned local sculptor John Smith of Darnick to carve the statue, which was unveiled in 1814 on 22 September: the anniversary of Wallace’s great victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297. It seems to be the earliest monument to Wallace, that near-legendary symbol of Scottish patriotism.”

“Sir Walter Scott knew the Earl well. He described him as a man whose ‘immense vanity obscured, or rather eclipsed, very considerable talents‘. As well as building monuments like the Wallace statue and the Temple of the Muses, he founded the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. The Society’s collections formed the basis of the National Museums of Scotland.”

— Information panel

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Waterloo Monument, Peniel Heugh

Waterloo Monument, Peniel Heugh

Waterloo Monument, Peniel Heugh

Date

25 August 2015

Location

Peniel Heugh, Teviotdale
NT 65378 26305; 55.52922°N, 2.55002°W

Information

Peniel Heugh is a 237 metre high hill to the north of the River Teviot close to the village of Ancrum. At its summit stands a notable landmark visible from miles around – the 45 metre tower was erected by William Kerr (1763-1824), 6th Marquess of Lothian, to commemorate the Battle of Waterloo. The original tower was designed by William Burn and collapsed during construction in 1815. The replacement structure was designed by Ancrum-born architect Archibald Elliot (1761-1823). The base of the monument bears a plaque with the following inscription:

To the
Duke of Wellington
and the British Army
William Kerr
VI Marquis of Lothian
and his tenantry
dedicate this monument
XXX June MDCCCXV

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