Campbeltown

Campbeltown

Date

21 August 2018

Location

Campbeltown, Kintyre, Argyll and Bute
NR 72150 20344; 55.42384°N, 5.60224°W

Information

With a population of c. 5,000, Campbeltown is the most southerly main settlement in the Kintyre peninsula. It also lays claim to being the westernmost town in mainland Great Britain. Originally known as Kinlochkilkerran, the town was renamed in the 17th century after Archibald Campbell (1629-1685), 9th Earl of Argyll and Chief of Clan Campbell.

Campbeltown’s importance grew as its industries of fishing, shipbuilding and whisky production thrived. 34 whisky distilleries have been established in the town, with 25 in concurrent operation in its heyday in the mid 19th century, and its fishing fleet numbered more than 600 vessels. Today, shipbuilding has disappeared, fishing activity has vastly reduced, and there are at present three whisky distilleries in operation in the town.

SEE MORE →

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch Volvo Garage

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch Volvo Garage

Date

15 February 2015
Location

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

SH 52607 71599; 53.22092°N, 4.20911°W

Information

At 58 characters long (the digraphs ‘ch’ and ‘ll’ are single letters in the Welsh alphabet), the place name Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch is said to be the longest in Europe and resulted from a local initiative in Victorian times aimed at boosting tourism. The name is Welsh for The church of Mary in the hollow of the white hazel near the fierce whirlpool and the church of Tysilio by the red cave. St Mary’s is the local anglican parish church, rebuilt in 1853, and St Tysilio’s church is located in the neighbouring town of Menai Bridge. The village is also, more conveniently, known as Llanfair Pwllgwyngyll (its original name), Llanfairpwll and Llanfair PG.

Originally a rural hamlet, Llanfairpwll grew in size and importance with 19th-century developments in transport infrastructure. In the 1820s Thomas Telford’s new road was built through the village on its path across Anglesey to the port of Holyhead. This formed part of the mail route from London to Dublin. And later the Chester and Holyhead Railway also came to the village, with its station — which is now a request stop — opening in 1848. The expanded name was adopted in the 1860s giving the station the longest name in Britain in an effort to encourage travellers to stop in the village.

Next to the former station building stands the James Pringle Weavers’ outlet. This visitor centre and department store, owned by The Edinburgh Woollen Mill, has been closed since it was damaged in October 2013 by a fire caused by an electrical fault in a fridge in the restaurant kitchen. As Pringles welcomed up to 20 coaches per day, its closure and the subsequent loss of all the coach-trip visitors has adversely affected the village’s economy. Pringles is scheduled to re-open on 1 March 2014.

Further Reading

Llanfairpwllgwyngyll (Wikipedia)

 

SEE MORE →

Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza I

Traction engine

Traction engine

Date

6 May 2013
Location

Llandudno, Conwy County Borough

SH 78383 82247; 53.32312°N, 3.82735°W

Information

Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza is an annual three-day event held in the main street of the town over the May Bank Holiday weekend. Originally conceived and organised by the town council in 1986 as a means of boosting tourism, the event was later taken over by a volunteer-run company. In its early days, this Victorian-themed carnival featured traditional entertainments with many people wearing period costume. Over the years, however, the emphasis has shifted, with much of funding for the event now coming from modern funfair attraction operators. The Extravaganza is held in conjunction with the Llandudno Transport Festival, whose venue is the nearby Bodafon Fields in Craig y Don.

Victorian Extravaganza (Official Site)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Dover Eastern Docks

Eastern Docks, Dover

Eastern Docks, Dover

Date

11 February 2013
Location

Dover, Kent

TR 33802 42150; 51.13086°N, 1.34028°E

Information

At a distance of 21 miles across the English Channel from France, Dover is Britain’s closest port to continental Europe. Its sheltered location at the mouth of the River Dour has been associated with maritime transport as far back as the Bronze Age, and the Romans built a harbour there — in fact, Dover was the base of the Roman fleet in Britain. The Port of Dover has been owned and operated since 1606 by the Dover Harbour Board, established by Royal Charter by James VI and I. Major improvements, involving the construction of new piers and breakwaters, were started in the 19th century to create a harbour of refuge for the Admiralty’s fleet and to put an end to the centuries-old problems of the harbour silting up with shingle.

The port comprises a square mile of enclosed water. Its Eastern Docks are home to the passenger and freight ferry terminal, while a cruise-liner terminal and marina are located at the Western Docks. At the latter there also used to be a railway station, which closed when the Channel Tunnel opened in 1994, and a hoverport, now demolished but which operated a hovercraft service until 2000 and a catamaran service until 2008. Currently there are plans to redevelop the Western Docks to create an additional ferry terminal.

With a throughput of 11.9 million passengers in 2012, Dover claims to be the world’s busiest passenger port. Four ferry companies run services from Dover to Calais and Dunkirk, and there is on average a departure every 30 minutes.

In 2010, the Dover Harbour Board, a statutory body with no shareholders, sought permission to privatise the port. In response to this, the Dover People’s Port Trust was set up by local campaigners with the aim of purchasing the port and running it as a ‘Big Society’-inspired community trust. Local residents voted decisively in favour of these plans in a non-binding referendum in March 2011. In December 2012, the Government tuned down the Board’s application for privatisation.

Dover Harbour Board (official site);
Port of Dover (Wikipedia);
Dover People’s Port

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

St Andrews

St Andrews from Buddo Ness

Date

3 November 2012
Location

Viewed from Buddo Ness, Fife

NO 55677 15155; 56.32667°N, 2.71831°W

Information

The settlement of St Andrews dates back to the 12th century and its university, the oldest in Scotland and third oldest in the English-speaking world, was established in 1410.

St Andrews used to be the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland until the 16th-century Reformation, when the country broke with the Papacy. Its cathedral, now in ruins, was the largest in Scotland.

St Andrews is internationally recognised as the ‘home of golf’.

St Andrews (Wikipedia)

Crail Harbour

Crail Harbour

Date

1 / 3 November 2012
Location

Crail, East Neuk of Fife

NO 61231 07413; 56.25760°N, 2.62736°W

Information

Crail is the oldest of the East Neuk burghs and its status as a royal burgh was confirmed in 1310 by Robert the Bruce granting its right to hold Sunday markets. The town prospered on trade with the Low Countries and its marketplace became one of the largest in medieval Europe.

In the 18th and 19th centuries, Crail’s harbour was a major port for herring and white fish, whereas today the main catch landed by its boats is lobster and crab.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Morecambe

Statue of Eric Morecambe on the sea front

Date

31 October 2012
Location

Morecambe, Lancashire

SD 43299 64479; 54.07309°N, 2.86800°W

Information

The Lancashire town of Morecambe developed around the harbour and railway built there in the mid 19th century. A century later, the town was enjoying its heyday as a popular seaside holiday resort.

— oOo —

Eric Morecambe (1926 – 1984), born John Eric Bartholomew, is best remembered for his partnership with Ernie Wise, forming the comedy double act Morecambe and Wise.

— oOo —

The Grade II* listed Streamline Moderne-style Midland Hotel was designed by architect Oliver Hill and built by the London, Midland and Scottish Railway company. The Art Deco building opened in 1933, replacing the previous Victorian railway hotel of the same name. The hotel was requisitioned during World War II and used as a military hospital. In 2003 it was acquired by Manchester-based developers Urban Splash, who re-opened it in 2008 following a £7m restoration.

Friends of the Midland Hotel

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Blists Hill Victorian Town (3)

Machine Shop

Date

28 August 2012
Location

Ironbridge Gorge Museums, Blists Hill, Telford

SJ 69603 03613; 52.62940°N, 2.45052°W

Information

The locomotive at Blists Hill Victorian Town is a working replica of the steam engine built in 1802 by the Coalbrookdale Company for Richard Trevithick. This was the world’s first ever full-scale railway locomotive.

Also on display at the open-air museum is The Spry, one of the last Lower Severn trows to be built. A trow was a flat-bottomed, single-masted boat with a large open hold designed for heavy goods transport on inland waterways. Trows would sail downstream and would be hauled when travelling in the opposite direction, originally by gangs of men, later by draft horses. The Spry was built in Chepstow and launched in 1894. Able to carry cargoes of up to 36 tons, the boat was used to transport loads of sand and stone. In 1936 it was converted for use as a barge to be towed by a tug, and it continued in service until the 1950s. The boat was discovered in Worcester in the 1970s and was later taken to Blists Hill for restoration.

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Blists Hill Victorian Town (1)

Blists Hill Victorian Town

Date

28 August 2012
Location

Ironbridge Gorge Museums, Blists Hill, Telford

SJ 69603 03613; 52.62940°N, 2.45052°W

Information

Blists Hill is an open-air museum run by the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. It is one of ten museums operated by the trust in the Ironbridge Gorge in Shropshire — a World Heritage Site generally regarded as the scene of the start of the Industrial Revolution. Blists Hill opened in 1973 and the 52-acre former industrial complex is home to a recreated Victorian town, with costumed actors demonstrating the various exhibits.

Industrial activity started at the site in the late 18th century with mining for coal, iron and clay. Blast furnaces and a brick and tile works were also later developed there. The remains of these industrial structures are incorporated into the museum, and the site also features a number of shops and businesses which have been either moved from their original locations and re-erected or built as replicas.

Ironbridge Gorge Museums; Blists Hill Victorian Town (Wikipedia)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Nantporth Stadium, Bangor

Barrier

Date

1 July 2012
Location

Holyhead Road, Bangor

SH 56535 72008; 53.22567°N, 4.15051°W

Information

The history of Welsh Premier League side Bangor City Football Club dates back to 1876, when the team played at Maes-y-Dref, a small field in the Hirael district. When the land there was converted into allotments in 1919, the club moved to the sports ground in Farrar Road, for which Lord Penrhyn had granted tenancy to Bangor Cricket Club in 1879.

The two clubs shared the site until the cricket club moved to Llandegai in 1928. Farrar Road thereafter remained home to Bangor City until the end of 2011.

Penrhyn Estates sold the football ground to Bangor City Council in the early 1980s and the club retained a right to play there “in perpetuity”. However, there was subsequently some dissatisfaction with the maintenance of the facility and during the 1990s BCFC wanted to move to a new home. This ambition was finally realised in January 2012 when the club moved into its new Nantporth stadium on the banks of the Menai Strait.

Demolition of the old stadium at Farrar Road started as soon as City moved to Nantporth, and construction of a new Asda supermarket there is currently in progress. Asda had previously planned to build there but had later withdrawn, and subsequent development plans for student accommodation, a leisure complex, shops and flats were rejected. Bangor City Council came to an agreement with Asda in 2010 and Gwynedd Council granted permission for the development in April 2011.

The site at Nantporth is owned by Bangor City Council and the ground was previously used as a playing field for Bangor University’s ‘Normal Site’ campus. Construction of the new stadium began in August 2011 and was completed in January 2012. It has a capacity of 3,000, with seating for 1,100.

Bangor City Football Club

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Shrewsbury Weir

Weir on the River Severn, Shrewsbury

Date

10 December 2011
Location

Shrewsbury

SJ 50077 13061; 52.71288°N, 2.74042°W

Information

With a length of 220 miles, the Severn is the longest river in the UK. Its source is in the Cambrian Mountains of mid Wales and it flows into the Bristol Channel via the Severn Estuary. The river meanders around the centre of Shrewsbury.

Shrewsbury Hydro, a local community group, has plans to build a hydro electric plant with underground turbines at the weir.

River Severn (Wikipedia);
Shrewsbury Hydro (Transition Town Shrewsbury);
Shrewsbury weir electricity plans get £15k of funding (BBC News, 6 December 2011)

Liverpool City Views

138 m (452 ft) tall Radio City Tower, built in 1969

Date

22 October 2011
Location

Liverpool

SJ 35385 89411; 53.39754°N, 2.97321°W

Information

Views of the city of Liverpool and beyond taken from the top of the tower of Liverpool Cathedral.

Radio City Tower (Wikipedia)
Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King Liverpool
Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral (Wikipedia)
Royal Liver Building (Wikipedia)
George’s Dock Ventilation and Central Station of the Mersey Road Tunnel (Liverpool World Heritage)
Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm (Wikipedia)
Fort Perch Rock (Wikipedia)
New Brighton Lighthouse (Wikipedia)
Port of Liverpool Wind Farm (Peel Energy)
Seaforth Wind Farm (Peel Energy)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…

Overleigh Cemetery, Chester

Overleigh Cemetery

Date

1 October 2011
Location

Handbridge, Chester

SJ 40309 65339; 53.18177°N, 2.89465°W

Information

History

By the 1830s, Chester’s ancient churchyards were full up. The Bishop of Chester had spoken of the disgraceful state of these burial grounds and of a “general feeling that the interments of the dead should be removed from the abodes of the living”. A private company proposed to develop the Little Roodee area as a new cemetery but the city authorities disapproved of this and, in 1847, Canon Blomfield suggested a site on the other side of the river instead. This land actually belonged to the Marquis of Westminster but, when approached, he agreed to exchange it for a modest shareholding in the new Chester General Cemetery Company and thus was commenced what is now known as the Overleigh Cemetery.

It was designed by local architect Thomas Wainwaring Penson (1818-64) and laid out in 1848-50 “with admirable taste”, including two chapels — one for Non-conformists and one (on higher ground) for Church of England members; two lodges; a house for the chaplain and a lake with islands. This has since been filled in and all of the buildings demolished — including, sadly, the ‘Greek temple’ on the far right of the picture — but the cemetery still contains a remarkable variety of Victorian monuments.

Natural Habitat

The cemetery provides a haven for wildlife with many differing birds frequenting the site. Hares and foxes have also been spotted and many areas have been deliberately left to accommodate the wildlife in this area.

Present Day

On the 1 April 2009 the Cemeteries and Crematorium Service, Lifetime Services Unit of Cheshire West and Chester Council became responsible for the management of Overleigh Cemetery. In February 2010 a programme of improvement works began.

As work progresses on clearing the overgrowth of brambles and ivy, the wonderful Victorian architecturally ornate memorials are being uncovered.

The clearance work has also provided the opportunity of utilising a previously overgrown and unused area that has now been turned into a much needed baby burial area. The only existing burial area dedicated only for babies in the Chester area is at Blacon Cemetery and this has been full for a number of years. The new ‘Baby Garden’ is scheduled to be ready in September 2010.

Much needed public seating has also been provided and a new notice board is shortly to be installed to provide a sense of identity to the area.

Despite a considerable degree of neglect in the past work is being carried out to revive and restore the area and make the cemetery more accessible for the community to take pleasure of the local heritage that exists there. Overleigh Cemetery remains a most pleasant and peaceful spot which you should definitely find the time to visit when you visit Chester.

 — Cheshire West and Chester Council information panel

Overleigh Cemetery History (Cheshire West and Chester Council);
The Grosvenor Bridge and Overleigh Cemetery (Chester – A virtual Stroll Around the Walls)

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE…