Pont Pen-y-benglog

Pont Pen-y-benglog, Llyn Ogwen

Date

28 March 2020

Location

Llyn Ogwen
SH 64914 60537; 53.12482°N, 4.02023°W

Information

In the early 19th century, Scottish civil engineer Thomas Telford (1757-1834) built the A5 road as the main London-to-Dublin mail route. The current ‘Pont Pen-y-benglog’ bridge over the Afon Ogwen was built to replace a difficult, steep section of the earlier coach route at the western end of Llyn Ogwen. The surviving arch of the earlier, medieval pack-horse bridge can be seen below the present one.

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Llyn Ogwen Pillbox I

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Pillbox, looking over Llyn Ogwen towards Tryfan

Date

18 May 2013
Location

Llyn Ogwen

SH 65486 60489; 53.12454°N, 4.01166°W

Information

With the fall of France and the defeat of the British Expeditionary Force in 1940, Germany, in the hope that Britain would surrender, made threats of imminent invasion. Turning the initial bluff into reality would, however, have taken a certain period of preparation, as Britain’s naval and air forces presented a formidable obstacle to mounting the threatened ground assault (codenamed Operation Sea Lion). Nonetheless, in the face of such threats, Britain undertook a major programme of constructing anti-invasion defences during 1940 and 1941. This involved building a network of coastal defences, backed up by a series of ‘stop lines’. Exploiting both natural and man-made barriers, such as rivers and railway cuttings, the stop lines were intended to slow down the advance inland of any invading force. The stop lines were reinforced with additional obstacles such as anti-tank blocks, barbed-wire entanglements, ditches and minefields, and were defended by gun emplacements and pillboxes.

The pillbox at Llyn Ogwen, protecting the A5 road, was part of Western Command’s network of stop lines in Wales, intended to defend against a possible German invasion coming via Ireland.

British anti-invasion preparations of the Second World War (Wikipedia)

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Panorama of the Glyderau from Carnedd Dafydd

Panoramic view from close to the summit of Carnedd Daffydd

Date

2 May 2011
Location

Carnedd Dafydd, Carneddau

SH 66142 62941; 53.14672°N, 4.00290°W

Information

With an elevation of 1044 m, Carnedd Dafydd is the fourth highest peak in Wales (when Garnedd Ugain in the Snowdon massif is included). The name of the mountain means David’s Cairn, probably in honour of Dafydd ap Gruffudd, younger brother of the last independent prince of Wales, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd. Dafydd was captured in 1283 and taken to Shrewsbury where he was hanged, drawn and quartered.

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Gwaith Copper Mine

Looking along Nant Ffrancon towards Tryfan

Date

26 February 2011
Location

Gwaith, Nant Ffrancon

SH 63026 63217; 53.14842°N, 4.04957°W

Information

In 1782 the Parys Mine Company discovered a vein of copper ore at this site. The main workings were below the old road close to the now ruined house Gwaith-maen. The yield from the mine amounted to only a few tons. A little higher up the slope of Carnedd y Filiast, below Cwm Graianog, an adit some 30 yards or so long was driven.

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