Machrihanish Beach

Machrihanish Beach

Date

21 August 2018

Location

Machrihanish, Kintyre, Argyll and Bute
NR 64172 20931; 55.42533°N, 5.72852°W

Information

The village of Machrihanish is located on the coast near Campbeltown in the Kintyre peninsula and its bay has three miles of sandy beach. The village is known for its world-class, championship golf course situated on the shore.

Close to the village is Campbeltown Airport, originally RAF Machrihanish, whose 3 km runway is one of the longest in Europe. Built in 1918, it served as a NATO base from 1960 to 1995. The site was acquired in 2012 by the Machrihanish Airbase Community Company and was shortlisted as a possible location for a future UK spaceport.

Further Reading

Machrihanish (Undiscovered Scotland)

SEE MORE →

Loch Lomond

Loch Lomond, Luss

Date

20 August 2018

Location

Luss, Argyll and Bute
NS 36077 93038; 56.10188°N, 4.63713°W

Information

With an area of 27 square miles, the 24-mile-long Loch Lomond is the largest inland loch/lake in Great Britain (the largest in the UK being Lough Neagh in Northern Ireland). The loch forms part of the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, which was created in 2002. There are several islands in the loch, one of which has been home to a colony of wallabies since the 1940s.

The picturesque village of Luss lies on the shore of Loch Lomond and is a very popular tourist destination. The settlement probably dates back to the 1300s and much of the village was rebuilt in the 1800s by the Colquhouns of Rossdhu Castle to provide housing for the workers in their nearby slate quarries.

SEE MORE →

Loch Fyne I

Loch Fyne

Date

20 August 2018

Location

Furnace, Argyll and Bute
NS 02135 99906; 56.15064°N, 5.18707°W

Information

At 40 miles long, Loch Fyne, in Argyll and Bute, is Scotland’s longest sea loch.

The name of the village of Furnace (formerly Inverleacainn) hints at its industrial heritage. In 1755 an iron furnace, which operated until 1815, was built there, with the local forest providing a ready supply of the charcoal required by the smelting process.

The local charcoal was later used in the manufacture of gunpowder at the Loch Fyne Powderworks in Furnace from 1841. This came to an end with an explosion in 1883.

A pink-granite quarry on the lower slopes of Dun Leacainn also opened in Furnace in 1841 and is still in operation today.

SEE MORE →