Lowther Castle

Lowther Castle

Lowther Castle

Date

30 July 2016

Location

Penrith, Cumbria
NY 52298 23805; 54.60713°N, 2.74002°W

Information

The site of Lowther Castle was the ancestral home of the Lowther family, which took its name from the River Lowther running through their lands. Around 1390 Sir High Lowther built a fortified tower with a beacon on top to warn of the approach of invading Scottish armies. Sir John Lowther rebuilt the tower as a country house in 1630 and this was demolished and replaced by a new mansion in 1691 by John Lowther (1655-1700), 1st Viscount Lonsdale. The mansion was partly destroyed by a fire in 1718 and was in turn demolished in 1805 and replaced by the present castle. This was built between 1806 and 1814 by William Lowther (1757-1844), 1st Earl of Lonsdale (second creation), and was designed by London architect Robert Smirke (1780-1867), who also designed the British Museum.

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Lancaster (Forton) Services

The Pennine Tower - closed since 1989

The Pennine Tower – closed since 1989

Date

29 July 2016

Location

M6 Junction 32-33
SD 50241 51971; 53.96139°N, 2.75988°W

Information

Lancaster (Forton) is a service station on the M6 motorway situated between junctions 32 and 33. It opened as Forton Services in 1965 and was designed by London-based architects T.P. Bennett and Son (founded by Sir Thomas Penberthy Bennett (1887-1980) and now known as tp Bennett LLP). The Pennine Tower, the distinctive hexagonal structure dominating the site is no longer in use and is a Grade II listed building. It originally housed a table-service restaurant with a sun deck above, but was closed to the public on account of fire regulations in 1989.

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Gafrod Niwbwrch

Gafrod Niwbwrch

Gafrod Niwbwrch

Date

17 July 2016

Location

Llyn Rhos Ddu, Newborough, Anglesey
SH 42644 64756; 53.15660°N, 4.35483°W

Information

  
“This sculpture depicts the ‘gafrod’ of marram grass, harvested and drying in the sun.

“Newborough residents used to harvest the grass every two years and leave it to dry from its green colour to a golden yellow. ‘Gafrod’ was a local term for the bundles of marram standing on end, gathered and tied at the top with a plaited cord of marram.

“Designed by Ann Catrin Evans with the assistance of Newborough’s residents and children.

“Commissioned by the Countryside Council for Wales”

  - Information plaque

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