Llanfairfechan

Llanfairfechan beach, looking towards Anglesey (left) and Puffin Island (centre), with a faint auroral glow above the horizon

Date

7 November 2017

Location

Llanfairfechan
SH 67906 75446; 53.25950°N, 3.98171°W

Information

Llanfairfechan;
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Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Erw Feiriol Cemetery, Llanfairfechan

Date

2 May 2016

Location

Pentre Uchaf, Llanfairfechan
SH 68255 74469; 53.25081°N, 3.97609°W

Information

Erw Feiriol Cemetery in Llanfairfechan is in the care of Conwy County Borough Council. The land for the cemetery was purchased by The Burial Board of Llanfairfechan after the parish passed a resolution to provide a local burial ground in 1878.

Further Reading

Llanfairfechan;
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St Mary’s Churchyard, Llanfairfechan

St Mary's Church, Llanfairfechan

St Mary’s Church, Llanfairfechan

Date

2 May 2016

Location

Pentre Uchaf, Llanfairfechan
SH 68300 74541; 53.25147°N, 3.97543°W

Information

The English translation of the place name Llanfairfechan is little church of St Mary. St Mary’s parish church was built there on the site of an earlier church in 1849. It was designed by diocesan architect Henry Kennedy (1814-1898). Kennedy was born in London and settled in Bangor after training as an architect. His career in church architecture was prolific and spanned some 50 years. The old parish church, which is a Grade II listed building, closed in 1999. The historic dedication to St Mary was then transferred to the nearby Christ Church. The latter, which is also a Grade II listed building, was built in 1864, the construction being funded by landowner John Platt (1817-1872) of Bryn-y-Neuadd Hall. As an anglican place of worship, it was built to cater for English tourists visiting the town and also to oppose to the growing number of nonconformist chapels in the area.

Further Reading

Llanfairfechan;
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Now and then VI: Llanfairfechan

Llanfairfechan - Now and Then

Llanfairfechan – Now and Then

Date

29 November 2014
Location

Llanfairfechan

Promenade
Railway Station, West Shore

 

SH 67987 75411; 53.25921°N, 3.98049°W
SH 67806 75194; 53.25721°N, 3.98310°W

Information

In the mid 19th century, Llanfairfechan was a small town lying between the scenic highlights of Penmaen Mawr mountain and Aber Falls. However, it subsequently developed as a Victorian seaside resort, becoming a tourist destination in its own right. Thanks to local landowner John Platt, Llanfairfechan got its own railway station in 1860, some 12 years after the station (which closed in 1960) in neighbouring Abergwyngregyn had opened on the then Chester and Holyhead Railway. Llanfairfechan’s station building was demolished in 1987 as part of alterations to make way for the construction of the A55 North Wales Expressway. The two-platform station is currently an unstaffed request stop managed by Arriva on the Crewe to Holyhead North Wales Coast Line and is used by around 13,000 passengers per year.

 

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Llanfairfechan

Llanfairfechan Beach

Llanfairfechan Beach – an expanse of sand is revealed at low tide

Date

29 November 2014
Location

Llanfairfechan

SH 67755 75290; 53.25807°N, 3.98392°W

Information

In the 1850s the village of Llanfairfechan had a population of around 800. It soon developed, however, into a popular Victorian seaside resort, thanks mainly to the arrival to the area of a couple of new landowners – Leicestershire solicitor Richard Luck purchased parts of Baron Hill estate from the Bulkeleys, and John Platt, a Yorkshire-born textile machinery manufacturer and Liberal politician from Oldham bought the Roberts estate. Platt rebuilt the derelict Bryn-y-Neuadd mansion there, which he completed around 1860. He also had the turnpike road moved away from his property and used his influence to have a railway station opened on his land for his travel convenience. The Chester and Holyhead Railway was built between 1844 and 1850 and a station in nearby Abergwyngregyn had opened in 1848. The station in Llanfairfechan opened in 1860, by which time the line was part of the London and North Western Railway. The seafront Promenade was also developed as the town became more popular with tourists. Platt additionally had plans for a marina. These were awaiting approval from Parliament, but were abandoned upon his death in 1872. An impressive harbour master’s residence had already been built for this and today it is used as holiday home.

Llanfairfechan now has a population of 3,600 and its Blue Flag beach, with its promenade, beach café, paddling pool, boating pool and water sports facilities, still attracts visitors. It is pebbly with a long expanse of sand uncovered at ebb tide, and the Morfa Madryn salt-marsh nature reserve is popular with bird watchers.

 

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The right of wheeling at foot pace Bath Chairs…

Public right of way notice, Llanfairfechan promenade

Public right of way notice, Llanfairfechan promenade

Date

20 June 2014
Location

Llanfairfechan

SH 67766 75284; 53.25801°N, 3.98374°W

Information

NOTICE

By the joint dedication of the Governors of Saint
Andrew’s Hospital Northampton – the
Owners of the Bryn-y-neuadd Estate – and Colonel
Henry Platt C.B. the Public are entitled to a right
of way on foot along the existing Path between this
point and the Glan-y-Mor Elias Road (such right including
the right of wheeling at foot pace Bath Chairs drawn by
hand or by Pony Mule or Donkey and wheeling children’s
Perambulators and Mail Carts)
All frequenters of this Footpath are required to use the
same in such a way as to cause as little interference with
the rights of, or annoyance to, the owners as possible

BY ORDER

U. D. COUNCIL OFFICES
LLANFAIRFECHAN JULY 1908

Bryn y Neuadd Hospital in Llanfairfechan provides psychiatric care for those with learning disabilities and mental illnesses. The Roberts family built a house on the site in 1667, which was demolished in 1862 when John Platt bought the estate and built a new mansion there. This was, in turn, purchased in 1898 by St Andrew’s Hospital, Northampton and used as an asylum. The mansion was knocked down in 1967 when the current hospital was built.

Further Reading

Bryn y Neuadd (llanfairfechan.org.uk)

 

Port Penrhyn

Hand crane, Port Penrhyn

Date

30 October 2011
Location

Port Penrhyn, Bangor

SH 59335 72873; 53.23419°N, 4.10898°W

Information

The importance to the slate industry of Abercegin dates back to around 1700, when boats would be loaded on the beach at low tide with produce from Penrhyn Quarry. The site was developed from 1780, becoming Port Penrhyn. Transport to the port improved in 1801 with the construction of the Penrhyn Railway. This started life as a horse tramway and was replaced around 1878 by a narrow-gauge railway on a different route and was in service until 1962. At its peak in the 19th century, the port would have regularly accommodated up to a hundred vessels.

Much of the port is now home to Dickies boat yard, which recently moved from its now demolished premises in Hirael Bay, Bangor.

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